Father orders son to punch boy in face at under-9 league game

via abc.net.au

via abc.net.au

… the 29-year-old father of three said it was the sight of his son’s “gushing” blood from a broken nose that now requires surgery which led to the moment of madness.

“I kinda lost the plot. I was calling out from the other side, ‘Go back and punch him’.”

John, who caught the initial incident on camera as he filmed his son’s game, claims his boy was pushed and then punched in the face by the other player after a successful tackle.

“All I noticed was he pushed my son first. My son went to push him back and that’s when the king-hit came. It was a big hook between the nose and eye. My son was rocked. He was just stunned.”

John admitted he yelled to his son from the sideline to hit back.
Bit of a conundrum my dear readers.  What standard do we set here?  Do we do like the adults do?  Who can truly say they don’t lean into the TV for a good look during a punch up at a union or league match?  Or even call others in the house over to look, or yell at the TV as to encourage their side?
Who believes we should allow our children to be punched and they shouldn’t respond in kind?  What values does that teach them?
But these were under-9s.  Is it OK when they are 17?  Or 22?

“We had a father-son talk. I’m a Polynesian and I was brought up the hard way. Stupid calls like this can affect his career in the long run and I don’t want him to lose his temper.”

A father of an under-9 is worried about his son’s League career.  What a tosser.

He agreed to attend two anti-violence workshops the Howick Hornets Rugby League Club asked him to go to.

John, who works graveyard shifts in a bakery six days a week, was also banned from further games until he had attended the It’s Not OK education sessions, but said the injuries had ended his son’s season.

“He can’t breathe properly. He can’t even do PE or anything.”

John wants the other player punished.

However the boy’s mother, who would only be named as Chantelle, said she believed John’s son started it.

She admitted that her son, who broke a knuckle in the fight, often threw punches on the field but said he had learned a lesson.

“He said a couple of days after … that he didn’t mean to punch the boy so hard. He said he doesn’t want kids to think they can bully him on the field. So if they hit him he’s always going to hit back, no matter what I say.”

 What would your response have been, watching Chantelle’s kid break your son’s nose?


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

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