When will Grant Robertson Move?

imagesThe word inside Labour after the 2011 election was that never again would they leave a leader who was obviously useless in place for as long as they left Phil Goff in place. The polls for three years said the same thing, Goff didn’t appeal to the public and the election results proved this.

Labour is in a similar situation with David Shearer. He is useless as a leader, has repeated polls showing how useless he is, and he is going to lead Labour into another term of opposition. Labour’s caucus know this because it is so obvious that even the most deluded and bewildered can see it.

Labour’s new system for electing leaders means that caucus can’t just axe Shearer and replace him with their preferred choice, Grant Robertson. They have to get the unions and the membership onside, and these two groups get 60% of the vote for the leader. They may not want Robertson, preferring David Cunliffe who is liked a lot better by those outside caucus than those inside.  

The problem for Grant is that if he doesn’t challenge now why will the party and the unions choose him over Cunliffe after Labour has been hammered in another election? Caucus may move more in Robertson’s favour, but why would the unions or the membership change their mind about him just because there has been an election loss?

Robertson should man up and challenge now to give Labour a fighting chance at the next election. He would be better to try than to wait, or he could spend another three years in opposition.

Of course they could mitigate the leadership spill somewhat by Robertson cutting a deal with Cunliffe so there is only one name on the ballot, and Cunliffe serves as Robertson’s deputy.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.