Find ‘Facebook’, Replace ‘Government’

The left wing loons and opposition politicians think that GCSB is going to employ 130,000 spies to trawl through all New Zealanders’ emails.

The suggestion is patently absurd.  But here’s an interesting data collection policy that is way worse than anything the Government is proposing.

I’ve exchanged the word ‘Facebook‘ for ‘Government’.

We also receive other types of information about you:

  • We receive data about you whenever you interact with the Government, such as when you look at another person’s timeline, send or receive a message, search for a friend or a Page, click on, view or otherwise interact with things, use a Government mobile app, or purchase Government Credits or make other purchases through the Government.
  • When you post things like photos or videos, we may receive additional related data (or metadata), such as the time, date, and place you took the photo or video. 
  • We receive data from the computer, mobile phone or other device you use to access Government services, including when multiple users log in from the same device. This may include your IP address and other information about things like your internet service, location, the type (including identifiers) of browser you use, or the pages you visit. For example, we may get your GPS or other location information so we can tell you if any of your friends are nearby.
  • We receive data whenever you visit a game, application, or website that uses a Government Platform or visit a site with a Government feature (such as a social plugin), sometimes through cookies. This may include the date and time you visit the site; the web address, or URL, you’re on; technical information about the IP address, browser and the operating system you use; and, if you are logged in, your User ID.
  • Sometimes we get data from our affiliates or our advertising partners, customers and other third parties that helps us (or them) deliver ads, understand online activity, and generally make the Government better. For example, an advertiser may tell us information about you (like how you responded to an ad by the Government) in order to measure the effectiveness of – and improve the quality of – ads.

We also put together data from the information we already have about you and your friends. For example, we may put together data about you to determine which friends we should show you in your News Feed or suggest you tag in the photos you post. We may put together your current city with GPS and other location information we have about you to, for example, tell you and your friends about people or events nearby, or offer deals to you that you might be interested in. We may also put together data about you to serve you ads that might be more relevant to you.

When we get your GPS location, we put it together with other location information we have about you (like your current city). But we only keep it until it is no longer useful to provide you services, like keeping your last GPS coordinates to send you relevant notifications.

All these tinfoil hat weirdos are all big fans of using social media to conduct their opposition to government spying but all very happy to allow Facebook, Twitter and Google to track their every movement.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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