Is Wongaland between Wogistan and Bogo Bogo Land?

We have heard about Wogistan and then Bongo Bongo Land, but what on earth is Wongaland?

Britain has an “Alice in Wongaland” economy in which people are taking out payday loans and raiding their savings to fuel shopping sprees.

Retail figures, published by the Office for National Statistics this morning, are expected to show that people are returning to Britain’s High Streets.

Experts have said that the warm weather, increased consumer confidence and the “feel good factor” created by the Royal Wedding stimulated growth.

However Ann Pettifor, of Prime Economics, warned that the improved figures were fuelled by debt and will ultimately prove to be “unsustainable” 

She also warned that the government’s Help to Buy scheme, under which people can take out government-backed mortgages to buy new homes, will create another “bubble”.

She said: “I think it’s artificial and can’t be sustained. People’s incomes are falling in real terms, and have done so for five years. Now there’s been this sudden, go on let’s just go made because everyone says its recovery.

“At a fundamental level it’s quite dangerous because household debt is still 153 per cent of GDP.

“There’s nothing seriously underpinning this recovery, and that’s why it’s Alice in Wongaland, the confidence fairy is out there.”


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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