Aussies having a sook about their election

The Aussies are having a sook about their election.

Many thought this was ”one of the worst elections we’ve ever had”.

But I remember people complained a lot about the 2010 campaign. What doesn’t seem to have occurred to people is that it’s hard to get excited about a contest when you know who’s going to win it. And with the media’s incessant quoting of opinion polls, no one could have been in any doubt. If the media want their election coverage to excite interest, they’re fouling their nest.

But ”one of the main reasons participants felt disconnected from politics and the election was their dissatisfaction with both of the major parties’ leaders,” the report says. ”Regardless of whether their values were more closely aligned with Liberal or Labor (or the Greens) few people had positive things to say about either Kevin Rudd or Tony Abbott.”

There was also disappointment with how the campaign had been run and, in particular, the lack of debate about policy, we’re told. Many complained the Liberal and Labor campaigns focused on ”slagging off” their competition instead of explaining policies. 

Participants were tired of the mud-slinging and personal attacks launched directly by the major parties’ leaders and felt that both lacked the charisma and vision required to inspire and help them connect with politics.

To this end, many hoped the election would bring an end to minority government, the constant bickering and lack of stability that has characterised the last few years of Australian politics, the report says.

But I say all the bickering and seeming lack of stability arose not from minority government as such, but from Abbott’s reaction to it, which was to assume government could fall into his hands at any moment and maintain a stance of total opposition to everything.

The past three years have left a nasty taste partly because of Julia Gillard’s unpopularity and Labor’s constant feuding, but mainly because Abbott ran a three-year election campaign of politicians eternally at each other’s throats.

What a big wussy-pants. Politics isn’t about hugs and cuddles, it is about gutting your opponent so you can get on with governing properly without distractions and the sooner people realise that the better.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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