The five myths about Tony Abbott that the election destroyed

Andrew Bolt talks about the 5 myths about Tony Abbott that have been destroyed by the election.

TONY Abbott’s landslide win over Labor hasn’t just destroyed perhaps our most deceitful and chaotic government.

It also exposed five myths that helped to ruin Labor.

Not that you would guess that from the self-denial of its leaders.

Kevin Rudd on Saturday night made out as if he’d actually left Labor in great shape, despite Labor winning the lowest primary vote in a century.

“I am proud that despite all the prophets of doom that we have preserved our federal parliamentary Labor party as a viable fighting force for the future,” he boasted.

The man tipped to be Labor’s next leader, Bill Shorten, even carried on as if Labor’s green madness was an asset, not a poison.

“There should be a price on carbon pollution,” he said after an election Abbott billed as a “referendum on the carbon tax”.

Don’t you just love politicians who declare an election is a referendum about something, then lose and want to continue litigating it. 

Now to the busted 5 myths:

MYTH 1: Tony Abbott is unelectable

Former Labor pollster Rod Cameron and union pollster Peter Lewis declared Abbott “unelectable”.

Laura Tingle, now of the Financial Review, four years ago declared Abbott’s election as Liberal leader “a disaster of epic proportions” for the party.

Labor spent years telling voters Abbott was a “sexist” and a “thug” with a “woman problem”. “Misogynist,” shouted Julia Gillard. “A pugilist,” sneered Rudd.

But the election campaign revealed to many voters the Abbott I know – an intelligent, disciplined, determined and good-humoured man. In office, Abbott will have many more chances to show people what he really is, including compassionate and moral.

Smears and slurs don’t work…just ask Labour here as they continue to smear John Key. It hasn’t worked for 6 years or more, why will it start working now?

MYTH 2: The rules of social media

Labor boasted that no one in this country had more followers on Twitter than Rudd. Gillard’s team skited that no politician had a more sophisticated social media campaign.

Labor and unions started groups such as “Women for Gillard” and “Destroy the Joint”. Unions funded GetUp, an alleged “independent” online activist group that claims “half a million members”.

And all the social media hot buttons were pushed – same-sex marriage, Abbott’s alleged misogyny, being nicer to boat people.

Even Christian Rudd at the end backed same-sex marriage – an issue hot on Twitter but tepid among the millions who actually decided this election.

But Labor followed that Twitter bird – right over a cliff. All its tweets ended in one loud splat.

Heh…how long have I been saying this? Twitter and Facebook are a false promise…likes and followers doesn’t lead to support…mostly they are sycophants or stalkers.

MYTH 3: Global warming is a huge issue

Labor hailed global warming as the “great moral challenge of our generation” because it had run out of causes to prove its superior morality.

The working class had grown too rich for envy politics. Red AIDS ribbons had faded. Feminism had so mainstreamed that even Abbott now promises absurdly expensive parental leave.

But then the drought ended and the planet continued to fail to warm – for 15 years now.

Result: Labor has been punished for giving us a carbon tax that once seemed so popular, yet now seems a useless burden.

Abbott, savaged by Labor as a warming sceptic, is rewarded for promising to axe the tax and strip billions from green schemes.

Tasmania – once the greenest state – on Saturday swung hardest to Abbott.

The Greens lost more than a quarter of their national vote, and probably their balance of power in the Senate.

If Labor keeps backing a carbon tax of any kind, it is likely to be belted again.

The green taliban are electoral poison and as Labour here cuddles up more and more tot eh Greens and the rhetoric becomes more extreme they will find the same thing here.

MYTH 4: You can divide and conquer

Which idiots in Labor thought it smart to turn Australians against each other?

Labor thought that was a great campaign technique, pitting women against men, poor against the “greedy” rich, workers against miners. How stupid.

Make someone your enemy and they’ll never vote for you. Make enough enemies and you cannot win. Labor must lose that hectoring and bullying tone. Humility and respect are the new political virtues.

And Labor should drop other hallmarks of the arrogant – like its itch to censor newspapers and restrict free speech.

More respect, please.

Sigh. Same here. Which brings us eerily to the 5th point which again has as many lessons in it for Labour in New Zealand as it does for Labor in Australia.

MYTH 5: Personal popularity matters

For nearly three years Labor fooled itself – and many journalists – into believing a popular leader could save a lousy party come the election crunch.

For almost every month she was prime minister, Gillard was more popular than Abbott.

Then Rudd was brought back because he was meant to be even more popular.

Even in the very last week of the campaign, the Nielsen poll showed he was preferred to Abbott as prime minister. Yet Labor was still smashed.

Performance counts. What a government does actually matters more than how its leader seems.

But Labor even today still recites a form of this leadership myth, claiming it lost simply because of disunity at the top.

It refuses to admit there would have been no leadership battles between Rudd and Gillard had either led well and ran a competent government.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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