Maybe this explains dead beat dads

Perhaps this study explains the prevalence of dead beat dads…maybe they have big balls?

They may have big balls but lack the stones to pay for their kids.

A US study measuring fathering habits and testicle size suggests that bigger may not be better when it comes to the day-to-day raising of small children.

The research involved 70 US men of varying ethnicities – most were Caucasian, five were Asian and 15 were African-American. All were the fathers of children aged one to two.

The larger the volume of their testes, the less the men were involved in daily parenting activities like changing nappies, said the study by researchers at Emory University in Georgia. 

In comparison, men with smaller testes showed more nurturing activity in the brain when shown pictures of their children, and also were more involved in their children’s upbringing, according to surveys answered separately by both the fathers and their female partners.

All the men in the study were aged 21-55 and lived with the biological mothers of their children. Most were married.

“I wouldn’t want to say that men with large testes are always bad fathers but our data show a tendency for them to be less involved in things like changing nappies, bathing children, preparing meals, taking them to the doctor and things like that,” said lead author James Rilling, an associate professor of anthropology.

The study sought to test an evolutionary theory that holds that people and animals are either built to breed or to nurture.

The findings support the notion that human beings have a limited amount of energy to invest in reproductive efforts – so either they put energy into producing offspring or into raising it.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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