A nasty drug

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Boing Boing reports on a nasty drug invented in Russia that is starting to take hold in the US.

Perhaps you’ve heard tell of Krokodil, an injectable street-drug popular in Russia that causes your skin to go green and scaly and eventually to rot off all the way to the bone at injection sites, and gives its habitual users permanent slurred speech and jerky motions, earning it the nickname of the “zombie drug?” Phoenix poison-control centers now report that they’re treating krokodil users, suggesting that the practice of using the drug recreationally is has begun to spread to American shores. A Google Image search for “krokodil” will supply you with ample nightmare fuel for years to come. 

The cocktail of chemicals used to make it doesn’t sound at all appealing to me.

The main ingredients in krokodil are codeine, iodine, and red phosphorous. The latter is the stuff that’s used to make the striking part on matchboxes. Sometimes paint thinner, gasoline, and hydrochloric acid are thrown into the mix. Like meth, it’s fairly easy to cook up in a home kitchen. You need a stove, a pan, and about 30 minutes. The drug is then injected directly into the vein, producing a high that lasts about an hour and a half. According to the Week, each injection costs about $6 to $8, while heroin is up to $25.

Makes cannabis look positively enticing.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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