Show Me the Money Redux, can’t hardly wait

The Labour Leadership race seems to be a bidding war between the candidates with no costings and no idea of how to pay for their promises.

The pork barrels have been rolled out in the Labour Party leadership battle, with Grant Robertson promising to introduce a “living wage” of more than $18 an hour for all government workers.

He told 350 party members and unionists in Levin yesterday that he would set a timeframe to phase in the living wage, which is currently set at $18.40 an hour for a family to live without suffering poverty.

He also pledged to lift the minimum wage to at least $15 an hour and repeal all of National’s industrial relations laws. 

Robertson later said he did not yet know the full cost of his promise, and that would determine how soon it could be introduced.

“It will have to happen over time because it will be costly.”

The country’s 43,345 public servants had a median base salary last year of $57,500.

The policy will give National further ammunition for painting Labour as the big-spending party.

They are setting themselves up for another “Show me the money” moment.

John Key will thrash them in the debates as they won’t be able to show how they can afford these policies.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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