Societies Office brings Unions out of the cold – Unions now on notice

The NZ Societies Office has now created a separate Union register (finally) and it is for all and sundry to view.

This is the biggest re-organisation of any selected group by the Societies Office since god knows when.

The whole 147 Unions are listed with incorporation dates and registration numbers.

Observation by the Owl

My first question is why would the Societies Office create a separate register?

I am pretty sure I know the answer. (refer to my post on Steven Joyce 29/11/2012)

Some quick statistics

There are 147 registered unions

111 are independent and don’t belong to the CTU (75% have said no to joining Helen Kelly’s CTU) 

Analysis

Of the unions that provided returns, 41.1% have fewer than 100 members. While the average number of members per union is 2815, the median is 136 members. The 10 largest unions account for 79.3% of the total union membership. More women (57%) than men are union members.

Membership trends 2008-2013

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

 
Union membership

373,327

387,959

379,649

384,644

379,185

371,613

% total employed labour force

17.4

17.9

17.4

17.4

17.0

16.6

% wage/salary earners

21.5

20.9

20.9

20.5

20.1

% change in union membership

-0.9

+3.9

-2.1

+1.3

-1.4

-2.0

% change in employment force

-0.2

+1.9

-0.1

+1.8

+0.7

+0.3

On 6.6% of the total workforce in the private sector belong to unions – that is an astounding 93.4% who have said NO and then NO and then NO again.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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