A Top Judge sorts out ratbag debtor

What a ripper…perhaps New Zealand should consider debtors prisons to sort these ratbags.

Jacqueline Anne Galland was before the court over a $2000 debt that she owed to a previous landlord.

The Tenancy Tribunal had ruled that Galland skipped away from a rental property leaving unpaid rent and so much rubbish that it cost the property owner $1000 to clean it up and resulted in him taking five trailer loads of rubbish to the dump.

In all, Galland owed the landlord $2014, but she alleged to the tribunal that she could only afford to pay him $2 a week.

The landlord asked that Galland be means tested by the court. Her allegation that she had no discretionary income was bearing out in court – until Judge David Saunders asked how much she spent a week on cigarettes.   

Galland said she did not smoke and did not she provide her son, who she supports, with cigarette money.

“But you asked him to get $62 worth of tobacco in New World on Monday,” Judge Saunders said.

“No I didn’t,” Galland replied.

“You were standing there beside him and told him what to buy,” the judge said.

“No.”

Judge Saunders: “Your son has a bald head and has a passion for cars, because he also bought a car magazine?” Galland: “Oh, that. That was Wednesday and it was his (the son’s) girlfriend’s money.”

Judge Saunders: “Wednesday was last night. It was Monday, and you were with your son because I was right behind you in the queue.”


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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