Labour, bereft of original solutions, steals slogans and failed policy

Spiralling property prices is an issue that Labour hopes to solve by introducing a Capital Gains Tax, bans on foreign property investment (especially if they are Asians) and compulsory savings.

These are all great ideas that haven’t failed to work elsewhere.

Oh wait…

Australian home prices surged to a record in September, driven by dwelling values at all-time highs in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane.

The RP Data-Rismark capital city index jumped 5.5 percent from a year earlier across Australia’s major cities, 0.7 percent above the previous record in October 2010, according to an e-mailed release from the researchers. Sydney and Melbourne led gains in the three months to Sept. 30, climbing 5.2 percent and 5 percent respectively to unprecedented levels.  

“Any debate about unsustainable growth in housing markets should be very much focused on Sydney and Melbourne,” Tim Lawless, research director at RP Data, said in today’s release. “The Australian housing market is broadly in the middle of a healthy growth phase; however if the growth trend in Sydney and Melbourne continues at the same pace into 2014, then there may be some cause for concern.”

Yes, Australia has a CGT, compulsory savings and restrictions on foreign investment, so their spiralling house prices are well under control.

Nothing to do with supply and demand at all.  That’s just ‘old’ thinking.



Recycling politicians, recycling slogans and recycling failed ideas, coming to an election near you.

Do you want:

  • ad-free access?
  • access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • access to Incite Politics magazine articles?

Silver subscriptions and above go in the draw to win a $500 prize to be drawn at the end of March.

Not yet one of our awesome subscribers? Click Here and join us.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.