PPTA: $63.6million not enough for bother

The PPTA have made it clear that their teachers can’t be bothered filling in forms if it is part of a process to help children behave well and perform better academically.

Teachers are shying away from disciplining badly behaved students because there’s too much paperwork involved, a regional teachers’ leader claims.

Principals have become frustrated with the discipline process, and teachers sometimes feel pressured to issue their own “informal consequences” instead of detentions, according to a paper to be presented at the Post Primary Teachers’ Association’s national conference in Wellington tomorrow.

Manawatu and Whanganui PPTA regional chairman Rob Torr says some teachers in the region are not allowed to issue formal detentions, or have significant restrictions put on using them.

“They can’t physically issue a formal lunchtime detention themselves. Instead, they have to fill out the appropriate paperwork, then pass it on to their manager, and that is time spent away from student learning.”

This is despite:

“In May, Education Minister Hekia Parata announced $63.6 million for the Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) programme.‘ 

But wait. Isn’t that over three times the amount going to Charter Schools on one small state school programme?

Hope the PPTA members are fully accountable for it and will be reporting back publicly on their usage of the funds. Every dollar should be accounted for and none in any way arrive in “private” hands.

And maybe their union could be reminded that teachers are paid to be bothered. $63.6 million to be bothered…if they can’t be bothered then perhaps Hekia could claw that back?

The good teachers must despair about this type of representation.

It is very hard to know why any genuine professional would pay fees to an organisation like the PPTA.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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