Rudd – a “bastard”, rude and dysfunctional

Now Kevin Rudd is powerless his former mates are going dog on him and slamming him openly in the media, describing him as dysfunction, rude and a “bastard”.

The former attorney-general Nicola Roxon has launched a scathing critique of the Rudd years, slamming former prime minister Kevin Rudd as a “bastard” who was a rude and dysfunctional leader and calling on him to quit politics.

“Removing Kevin was an act of political bastardry for sure. But this act of political bastardry was made possible only because Kevin had been such a bastard himself to so many people already,” she said on Wednesday evening.

But in giving the John Button lecture, Ms Roxon also acknowledged that while Labor did the right thing by getting rid of Mr Rudd in June 2010, the party did it in a clumsy way. “I think we had all the right reasons to act but I think we were clumsy and shortsighted in the way we did it.”  

The former Labor frontbencher, who quit politics at last month’s election to spend more time with her family, also spelled out “handy hints” for a future Labor government. In reference to the whirlwind days of the Rudd government, Ms Roxon argued that governments should not do too many many things at once.

“The truth is, government actually can’t cope with it and the public can’t absorb it.”

I love the use of “political bastardry”…there is nothing better than low bastardry in politics, it rinses the squeamish and sorts out the ratbags.

Good leaders always have someone who can act with low bastrddry…Helen Clark had David Lewis for the backrooms and media manipulation and Trevor Mallard as the public head kicker.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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