Drink Driving limit to be lowered

The government has announced that they are going to lower the drink driving limit.

Prime Minister John Key says cabinet has agreed to lower the blood alcohol limit for all drivers.

The limit will fall from 0.08ml per 100ml of blood to 0.05ml.

Key said the new lower limit would give fines to drivers caught between the old limit and the new one.

He said the government had a strong track record for road safety, with the road toll falling by about 100 deaths a year while in government.

“The work is not over, no death is acceptable.”

Transport Minister Gerry Brownlee said the decision was striking a balance of showing that the government was serious about alcohol in driving, while deciding whether drivers were criminals.  

Drivers in between the limits would incur 50 demerit points, meaning two offences in two years would result in licenses being lost.

It was not expected drivers having a drink after work or a wine with dinner, Brownlee said, saying he expected having “one or two” would probably fall below the limit.

It was hard to assess how much court time would be taken up if breaches of the lower limit would see offenders taken to Court.

Brownlee said the AA had indicated support of the policy.

It sounds like the government has obtained some evidence to support lowering the limit…this is a good thing rather than emotive law changes.

Research on whether the lower limit would lead to lower accidents and deaths had come back in the last six to eight weeks.

Brownlee said the two year review of the impact of lowering the legal blood alcohol limit by 30 milligrams suggests 3.4 lives will be saved a year and 64 injury causing crashes avoided – and save $200 million in social costs over 10 years.


Do you want ad-free access to our Daily Crossword?

Do you want access to daily Incite Politics Magazine articles?

Silver Subscriptions and above go in the draw to win a $500 prize to be drawn at the end of March

Not yet one of our awesome subscribers? Click Here and join us.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

53%