Cry Baby of the Week – Sarah Warren

Obviously too hard to clear the letter box too, might strain her arms

Obviously too hard to clear the letter box too, might strain her arms

A Waikato woman with 20 years experience as a bludgers has run off to the media to moan about hard done by she is having to once a month present her sorry arse at a WINZ office.

A Waikato woman with no car or access to a bus walked the equivalent of a marathon to make a Work and Income appointment, to stop her benefit getting cut off.

Sarah Warren, a Putaruru mother of four who has been on the benefit for the past 20 years, walked from Putaruru to Tokoroa twice in the past month after receiving a letter from Work and Income requiring her to attend a mandatory meeting

20 years? Apart from pop out 4 children, who will likely be like their mother, what else has she done for 20 years?

“There’s no fulltime jobs around here. They [Work and Income] say you might have to move out of town to look for a fulltime job, but my kids are happy where they are.”

Ever thought about a couple of part time jobs love? 

Don’t you just love the sense of entitlement here, ‘I don’t want to move to find a fulltime job and provide a better future for my kids so YOU (the taxpayer) should have to pay for me to live here’

One of my reders handily looked up the Intercity timetable which they have thoughtfully put online.

Just looked up the Intercity coach timetable. The bus leaves Putaruru at 1055 or 1248 for the 25 minute journey to Tokoroa and returns at 1650. Maybe the journo could have checked that out and begged the question.

Yes, here are the times.


It is hard not to come to the conclusion that this woman is a parasite with an unhealthy dose of entitle-itis.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.