Fancy paying for ‘green’ energy?

I don;t if th UK is anything to go by.

‘Green’ energy is highly subsidised, inefficient and expensive, with consumers paying too much for energy costs.

Consumers face paying millions of pounds too much for solar farms after ministers handed the industry subsidies 10 per cent higher than it had asked for.

Industry body the Solar Trade Association said on Wednesday it “can’t understand why” ministers rejected its suggestion to cut subsidies further – reducing the cost of ‘green levies’ on consumer energy bills.

“From 2016 to 2019 [the subsidies] are actually higher than we asked for,” the Solar Trade Association (STA) said.  

The Department of Energy and Climate Change set out plans to guarantee new solar farms built in 2017-18 a price of £110 for every ‘megawatt-hour’ (MWh) unit of power they generate – about twice the current market price.

The figure was £5 less than it had initially offered in draft plans, but the industry said it was still unnecessarily generous.

But the STA said it had told the government it only needed £99/MWh in 2017-18 – meaning DECC’s proposals will leave consumer paying 10 per cent too much.

Subsidies for 2018-19 were 9 per cent more generous than the industry had asked for while those for 2016-17 were 4 per cent too high.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.