Gutsy decision to rein in Aussie Human Rights Commission

Judith Collins could learn from Australia’s Attorney-General George Brandis who has just set the cat amongst the pigeons with a new appointment to their Human Rights Commission.

Senator Brandis said Mr Wilson’s appointment would “restore balance to the Australian Human Rights Commission” which, he said had “become increasingly narrow and selective in its view of human rights” under Labor.

He praised Mr Wilson’s credentials for the role.

“He has published and broadcast widely on the topics of personal freedom, liberal democratic values and the rule of law. He was at the forefront in thwarting recent attempts to erode freedom of speech, freedom of the press and artistic freedom – rights and freedoms Australians have always held precious.”  

Tim Wilson has also pledged to remove the so-called “Andrew Bolt” provisions of the Racial Discrimination Act.

Mr Wilson warned against an incremental dilution of human rights.

He threw his support behind Senator Brandis’s pledge to abolish the ”Andrew Bolt” provisions of the Racial Discrimination Act that make it unlawful to offend and insult people because of their race.

The move to amend or repeal Section 18C and, possibly, other parts of the Act will honour an election promise, will change the definition of racial vilification to eliminate at least two of the grounds that were used to rule against the columnist over articles about light-skinned Aboriginal people.

”I’m looking forward to reasserting the importance of human rights and advancing the government’s freedom agenda,” Mr Wilson said.

And he is also nominating free speech and media freedom as his priorities.

”Human rights are important, consistent and universal and provide the foundations for a free society,” Mr Wilson told The Australian. He nominated free speech and media freedom as his two key priorities, saying both had come under attack under the last government.

”Freedom of speech and freedom of the press are essential for a free society,” Mr Wilson said.

”A free media is a direct extension of the importance of free speech and are one and the same in importance.

”We need to remove the restrictions that have stopped people saying what they think and believe.

”Only through a contest of ideas will our society flourish,” he continued, condemning the proposals by the last government to change anti-discrimination laws to ban conduct that ”offends or insults”.

”We shouldn’t have restrictions on what may offend or insult because they just end up restricting speech and stop incorrect ideas being challenged and rebutted.”

Time for  similar change here. Our Human Rights Commission is a travesty along with their retard cousin organisation the Privacy Commission.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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