McCready contemplating prosecuting Cunliffe

I’d say Graham McCready will end up prosecuting David Cunliffe, mainly because the Police have never acted on any complaint and there are more than 50 from 2008 and 2011 that remain untouched by Police.

Serial litigant Graham McCready has put Labour leader David Cunliffe on notice: if the police don’t prosecute him for breaking electoral rules, then he will.

McCready said Cunliffe could expect court action within six months.

Cunliffe is being investigated by the police after the Electoral Commission referred a tweet he sent on the day of the Christchurch East by-election, encouraged people to vote for Labour Candidate Poto Williams.

“If you are resident in Christchurch East don’t forget to vote today – for Labour and Poto Williams!” he wrote on Saturday.

Under Electoral Commission rules, no campaigning of any kind is allowed on election day.

Yesterday the commission announced it had referred Cunliffe to the police saying it believed he had breached the Electoral Act.

Police were yet to decide whether there were grounds for prosecution. 

The Police don’t get to decide that, it is up to the electoral Commission and they have referred it to Police FOR prosecution.

But McCready said if police took too long, then he would launch a private prosecution.

“I’ve diaried it for the end of May, because you have six months to make a prosecution,” McCready said.

“I don’t want to be in a situation like I was with [ACT leader John] Banks, where the police took a whole lot of time over deciding [whether to prosecute].”

Perhaps Graham McCready might also like to look at prosecuting Phil Goff for breaching suppression orders. The police there failed to prosecute.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.