Why we need to get into more oil exploration

The Green Taliban and their enablers in the Labour and Green parties don’t want us exploring for oil.

The Herald highlights exactly that it is is that they are trying to prevent.

The US Energy Department says the nation’s energy picture is getting ever rosier. Production is rising, consumption is slowing, and prices are expected to remain in check.

According to the Energy Department’s annual outlook, domestic oil output may regain the peak it reached in 1970 over the next two years and petrol prices will fall over the same period to just over $US3 per gallon (NZ$3.60 for 3.8 litres). 

Natural gas production and use will continue to soar, demand for petrol will fall, and energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide will remain below 2005 levels for the next quarter-century.

“The report confirms that the United States really is experiencing an energy revolution,” said Daniel Yergin, vice chairman of the research and analysis group IHS and author of “The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World.”

The increased oil and gas production, Yergin said, is giving “a big boost to the US economy at a time when it really needs a boost.”

The outlook, produced every year by the Energy Information Administration, projects US production, consumption, and prices for energy through 2040. On Monday the EIA revealed the first part of the outlook, its “reference case,” which assumes stable domestic and global markets and policies.

Their opposition to fracking, drilling and exploration is actually holding New Zealand back.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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