There is one thing WI-Fi has killed and it isn’t a kid

It is the hotel mini-bar according to a survey conducted by

Is it time to say goodbye to the hotel mini bar?

A recent survey by the travel website found that the hotel mini bar was the least important amenity for U.S. travelers. Only 21% of travelers ranked the mini bar as an important amenity, compared to 89% who called free in-room wireless Internet the most important.

There is little financial reason to keep mini bars. Hotel consulting firms estimate that mini bars generate no more than 0.24% of total hotel revenue, with much of that eaten up by the cost to check and restock the bars.

Companies that build and sell automated mini bars that electronically charge guests when a drink or snack is removed from the bar say they can cut the labor costs up to 60%. 

Still, industry experts say mini bars won’t be around for long.

Many hotels don’t offer them because of the hassle of restocking and the disputes with guests over mini bar fees, said Lynn Mohrfeld, president of the California Hotel and Lodging Assn.

“They are a very difficult amenity to manage,” he said.

But the future of mini bars is bleak mostly because of social trends that have pushed travelers into the lobbies to socialize and surf the Web, instead of sitting alone in their rooms, eating mini bar food, said David Corsun, director and associate professor at the Knoebel School of Hospitality Management at the University of Denver.

It’s the same reason some hotels are eliminating room service and beefing up the food and drink offerings in the lobby, Corsun said.

“People are migrating out of their rooms rather than being in the rooms,” he said.

I have never used mini-bars, except to empty them and put the contents on the bench, then fill it back up with stuff I have bought at the 7-Eleven or equivalent convenience store around the corner.

When travelling now I always check that free wi-fi is available.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.