Real poverty or an outcome of poor decision making?

Photo / Greg Bowker via NZ Herald

Photo / Greg Bowker via NZ Herald

People are queuing for 6 to 7 hours for free food at a City Mission in Auckland.  Sam Boyer reports:

Aucklanders are queuing for up to seven hours for food parcels from the City Mission, as donations run thin.

The waits are only expected to get worse as Christmas nears, with needy families arriving at the mission increasingly desperate.

Auckland city missioner Diane Robertson said people were prepared to wait most of the day because they had nowhere else to go.

How about these people spend 6 or 7 hours working instead of standing in a line?

Is that too radical a thought?  

“For some people it is a wait of six or seven hours to receive a Christmas food parcel. I think it will probably get worse.

“What we’re seeing now is what we would usually see in the last few days before Christmas.”

Everyone who received a food parcel was tested by Work and Income at the mission, Ms Robertson said.

“It’s about numbers being large and it’s also about people being desperate.

“Every single person who comes through here has nowhere else to go … people have exhausted every option before they come here. Believe you me, unless you really had to, you wouldn’t do this.

Never eaten at Valentines I guess?

People will do all sorts of things to get more than their fair share.


Source:  NZ Herald

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.