Sir Richard Hadlee incensed about Piers Morgan/Brett Lee stunt

If you haven’t already seen the video, I ran it earlier today.  It’s gotten Sir Richard’s box out of position in a major way

As a former fast bowler I was appalled and outraged at what I witnessed during the tea break on the second day of the fourth Ashes cricket test at the MCG when former Australian fast bowler Brett Lee faced off British media host Piers Morgan in the nets.

I am so incensed I felt I needed to make comment.

While there were media jibes and a build-up to this bowling and batting contest on Friday, I could not believe my eyes – Lee’s brutal assault on Morgan was extremely dangerous and unnecessary.

It was clear that Morgan could not bat or defend himself against Lee’s pace and intimidation – this was an unfair and one-sided contest that could have had severe consequences. Sadly, in the past batsmen have died from receiving blows to the body.

I only hope that Brett takes a few minutes to reflect on his stupidity – this was a brain explosion of the highest order – it was a deliberate attempt to hit, injure, hurt and maim his opponent that I viewed as a form of grievous bodily harm or a human assault that could have proved fatal. Morgan, aged 48, was hit four times on the body and if he was hit on the head or across the heart the result could have been devastating.

Such is the general dislike of Morgan, I don’t think anyone who was watching would have been too concerned.  What Sir Richard forgets is that Morgan stood there out of his own free will.  How dumb is that?  

Given the same situation, if I wanted to embarrass Morgan for tweet jibes I would have taken more pleasure out of trying to hit the stumps six times than deliberately trying to hit him.

I believe Lee has erred badly and on reflection may realise that he has damaged the image of the game of cricket. There will be many mums and dads around the world who saw that exhibition and may decide to stop their kids from playing the game, such was the brutality and the risk to someone’s life.

This should not have been shown on live television – people could have witnessed a tragic accident that the game of cricket never wants to see. Some people may have viewed this as fun and entertainment but it was not cricket – that sort of bowling against an inexperienced opponent was unacceptable.

To me there is no skill as a fast bowler to run in from 20 metres and bowl the ball halfway down the pitch, directing the ball at the batsman’s body – especially when he is backing away to protect himself.

In fact I would suggest former players Mark Nicholas, Shane Warne and Michael Vaughan, who compered the exhibition, would not have enjoyed or even handled the way Lee bowled to Morgan – with all the batting experience they have had, I am sure they would not have placed themselves in that situation.

And yet, they were a group of consenting adults.  TV is full of people who are happy to take risks and inflict or receive deliberate harm.  It may not have done anything for “the game”, but it was done by people who agreed to do it, and it was terribly entertaining in a debased vicarious sort of way.

Just as it was intended.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.