The trapped warmists is surely the funniest story of the year

The ongoing saga of the idiot warmists trapped in sea ice during summer as they attempt to follow in the footsteps of another Antarctic expedition from 1912.

There is a slight problem with their attempt. In 1912 Mawson actually managed to sail right into Commonwealth Bay with no ice to be seen.

The first boat to go ashore at Commonwealth Bay. © Mitchell Collection, State Library of NSW (Photo: Percy Gray)

The first boat to go ashore at Commonwealth Bay. © Mitchell Collection, State Library of NSW (Photo: Percy Gray)

There is even film footage available.

Compare that to today, where the expedition, trying to compare the impact of global warming (snigger) on the environment since Mawson’s time.

A second icebreaker has now given up reaching the forlorn scientists…ermmm…media…uhmm…activists…ahem..tourists trapped by sea ice.

The Aurora Australis has abandoned its first attempt to cut through the ice surrounding the stranded Akademik Shokalskiy after moving just two nautical miles.

Around 6am the Aurora’s captain Murray Doyle began to manoeuvre the icebreaker through thick wedges of consolidated sea ice. 

But by 9am, the master made the call to turn the ship around and move back into open water.

“The ice became too thick for us to penetrate. Some of the floes are up to two metres of ice with a metre of snow on top and very compact.”

“There was just nowhere for us to go,” he said.

The mocking on Twitter is growing:

Meanwhile the trapped warmists are claiming that sea ice is disappearing because of climate change.

seaice

 

Except it isn’t disappearing…it is larger than it has ever been before in the Antarctic and also growing in the Arctic. To claim too that sea ice…i.e. ice made from the sea is “freshening” the seawater is farcical.

Now their carbon footprint is set to grow massively as they contemplate evacuation via helicopter.

An Antarctic blizzard has halted an Australian icebreaker’s attempt to reach a Russian ship trapped for a week with 74 people onboard, rescuers say.

The Akademik Shokalskiy left New Zealand on November 28 on a private expedition to commemorate the 100th anniversary of an Antarctic journey led by Australian explorer Douglas Mawson.

It became trapped in the ice on December 24, 100 nautical miles east of the French Antarctic station Dumont D’Urville. The 74 people aboard include scientists and tourists, many of them Australian, and 22 Russian crew.

A first rescue attempt by a Chinese icebreaker, the Snow Dragon, had to be halted because the ice was so thick.

Now another attempt, by the Aurora Australis, has been hampered by the weather.

It has had to return to open waters about 18 nautical miles from the Akademik Shokalskiy because of poor visibility, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA), which is co-ordinating the rescue, said.

The Australian vessel had reached as close as about 10 nautical miles from the trapped ship before turning back.

“The weather condition is not safe for it to proceed, and it’s gone back to open water,” said AMSA spokeswoman Lisa Martin.

This is fast becoming the joke of the year.

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So the modern day explorers investigating sea ice loss are stuck in ice while Mawson sailed right up and into Commonwealth Bay.

Mawson's ship in Commonwealth Bay

Mawson’s ship in Commonwealth Bay


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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