Turia lines NZ up for WTO slapping


Typical at this time of year, you get pollies trying to look as though they’re doing something.  Tariana Turia is one such pollie. It isn’t called the silly season for nothing.

While the vast majority of Kiwis are thinking about Christmas and the holidays, word out of Wellington is that Turia was so incensed at not getting her prized plain packaging of tobacco products bill onto the Order Paper before Parliament rose, that she demanded her bill be dropped on the Clerk of the House before Christmas.

Maybe the NZ Herald needs to re-print their Editorial: Smokers don’t give a fag about plain packaging

But John Key’s not going to fall for that old trick. Quick as a fast, he’s poured cold water on the idea saying;

“”But it’s very, very unlikely it will be passed. In fact, in my view it shouldn’t be passed until we’ve actually had a ruling out of Australia.

“We think it’s prudent to wait till we see a ruling out of Australia. If there’s a successful legal challenge out of Australia, that would guide us how legislation might be drafted in New Zealand.

Turia tends to forget that New Zealand is a little country at the bottom of the world that relies heavily on trading its wears to the world. Getting all uppity about plain packaging for fags that ends up getting NZ hauled before the WTO to face trade sanctions is not a bright idea in anyone’s books.

Especially when the Government’s own advice says;


Letting Australia get slapped in the chook by the WTO before lining up NZ for a slap is a much better idea.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.