Nanny State seeks to kill sugar thrills

Helen Clark got hurled out of Parliament for allowing her government to interfere too much in ordinary Kiwi lives. Things like trying to tell people what light-bulbs and shower-heads they were allowed to buy.

Kiwis just want to get on with their lives without being dictated to by nanny state zealots, desperate to push their agenda onto the populace.

So when the academic activists at Otago and Auckland Universities start calling for a 20% tax on cold tea and coffee, most people feel like telling them to take a long walk off a short pier.

But that’s exactly what the taxpayer funded troughers at FIZZ are calling for.

They’re now saying that cold tea and coffees are evil and part of the cause of obesity in New Zealand.

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As such, they want a 20% excise tax on all these drinks with that money used for “health promotion”, social marketing campaigns, restrictions on marketing to children, limit sponsorship from the likes of Coke, tell businesses what drinks they can serve, and the list goes on and on.

All cunning policy ideas to keep them deep in the tax-payer funded trough for years, just like the anti-tobacco trougher Shane Kawenata Bradbrook and his mates have done.

So who are these people you ask?

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Certainly some veteran troughers on that list.  Top of the list is 2013 Trougher of the Year Boyd Swinburn, who likes to swan around Lake Como, dreaming up high-brow declarations calling on Governments to ban, restrict and tax drinks he doesn’t like.

I think it’s time for another look and some sunlight on the troughers sucking at the tax-payers tit.


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