Stone Age religion takes offence at cute doggies

Seriously if you can be offended by a Scottie dog then Glasgow might not be the best place to visit if you are a sensitive wee Islamist fundamentalist who is deeply concerned about anything in life which you might get pleasure out of.

Suicide bomber blowing up innocent civilians…straight to paradise, walking a Scottie dog…60 lashes.

Of course losing an airplane entirely with the loss of everyone onboard and flying another one over a war zone with similar results isn’t at all shameful and offensive, but walking a freakin’ dog is.

Malaysian politicians and religious leaders have attacked the use of Scottie dogs during the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony, claiming it was disrespectful to Muslims.

Around 40 Scottie dogs were used in the opening ceremony in Glasgow last Wednesday to lead teams around Celtic Park.  

The dogs, which all wore tartan dog coats with the name of each team on them, were widely praised on social media, with many people stating they thought they had “stolen the show”. Hamish, who led out the Scotland team, received one of the biggest cheers of the night.

Judy Murray tweeted after the ceremony: “Scottie dogs in tartan coats at CG opening ceremony. Barkingly brilliant.”

However, not everyone was as impressed. Political and religious leaders in Malaysia have claimed the use of dogs connected to Muslim countries was “disrespectful”.

Many Muslims refuse to have direct contact with dogs, which are considered by some to be “unclean” in Islamic culture. Some overseas Muslim groups have reportedly previously called for a jihad on dogs.

Possibly making matters worse was the fact that Jock, who was supposed to lead out the Malaysian team, sat down and refused to move as soon as his coat was put on, meaning he had to be carried by the team representative.

Mohamad Sabu, the deputy president of the opposition Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party said: “Malaysia and all Islamic countries deserve and apology from the organiser.

“This is just so disrespectful to Malaysia and Muslims – especially as it happened during Ramadan. Muslims are not allowed to touch dogs, so the organiser should have been more aware and sensitive on this issue.

“It is hoped this incident can teach other Western countries to be more respectful in the future.”

Dato Ibrahim Bin Ali, a far-Right politician, former MP and founder and president of Malay supremacist group Perkasa also called for an apology.

“I think it is unbecoming. The hosts have not been sensitive enough – especially in a so-called knowledgeable and civilised society like Britain,” he said. “It is shameful and has offended not only Malaysia as a Muslim country, but Muslims around the world.”

No doubt some liberal apology for politician will express extreme regret instead of telling them to take their whinging elsewhere.

If you go to Malaysia and try whinging like that about being offended they’ll probably incarcerate you for disrespecting Islam and give a few strokes of the rotan on the way through.

I’m sick to death of people being outraged for the sake of being outraged.

– The Telegraph


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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