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Photo Credit Sebastian Liste/Noor, for The New York Times Zero Freitas, on the records, Freitas is a wealthy businessman who, since he was a child, has been unable to stop buying records. ?I?ve gone to therapy for 40 years to try to explain this to myself.?

Photo Credit Sebastian Liste/Noor, for The New York Times
Zero Freitas, on the records, Freitas is a wealthy businessman who, since he was a child, has been unable to stop buying records. ?I?ve gone to therapy for 40 years to try to explain this to myself.?

Meet the man who would own all the vinyl records in the?world

Zero Freitas’ collection of several millions albums continues to grow

62-year-old Zero Freitas is buying every vinyl record he can find.?The New York Times reports?that the Brazilian businessman’s collection currently spans “several million albums” and that total is still growing. Just last year, more than a dozen 40-foot-long shipping containers delivered hundreds of thousands of new acquisitions to the warehouse where Freitas’ hoard resides.

“I?ve gone to therapy for 40 years to try to explain this to myself,” he tells?The New York Times. His compulsion to buy records, he says, is tied up in childhood memories: a hi-fi stereo his father bought when Freitas was 5 and the 200 albums the seller threw in as part of the deal.?Freitas was an adolescent in December 1964 when he bought his first record, a new release: ?Roberto Carlos Sings to the Children,? by a singer who would go on to become one of Brazil?s most popular recording stars. By the time he finished high school, Freitas owned roughly 3,000 records.

Freitas isn’t alone in his pursuit. He has a team of scouts spread across the world, all tasked to assist him in procuring more records. Thanks to them, he owns almost everything that has been recorded in Cuba as well as Bob Hope’s personal stash. Freitas also employs a team of college interns who are responsible for cataloging his ever-expanding trove; the interns can collectively catalog about 500 records per day.

His New York buyer Allan Bastos estimates it would take years to complete this feat. “Probably 20 years, I think.”

In the future, Freitas hopes to make his vast archive available to the public. Dubbed “Emporium Musical,” it will function similar to a library, except with an assortment of listening stations. As music archivist Bob George told Freitas, “What’s the good of having it if you can’t do something with it or share it?”

Full Story:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/10/magazine/the-brazilian-bus-magnate-whos-buying-up-all-the-worlds-vinyl-records.html?_r=1

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