The 10:30pm phone call from Kim Dotcom

If you are are Dotcom watcher, last Friday was extraordinary.

On his morning show on Radio Live, Sean Plunket was making repeated calls for the “Rawshark”, the person allegedly behind the hacking of my emails, to stand up and take some sort of responsibility.  Time and time again, Sean called on Rawshark to phone in.

And then something really unexpected happened.

Kim Dotcom phoned in for a live talkback exchange with Sean.

After being media shy and running away from reporters at his own party’s election launch, he suddenly made himself available to an interviewer who would not be offering Kim the usual PR platform afforded to him by the likes of the Herald or TV3.

During this conversation, Kim Dotcom made extraordinary claims.

1.  That Tony Lentino did not pay the Coatesville Mansion rent while Kim was short of cash

2.  That Mona Dotcom did not go see Tony Lentino about this issue while Kim was on remand in Mt Eden prison

3.  That lawyer Jordan Williams, while being engaged for his professional services at the time via the company that employed him, unethically obtained a confidential document and later released that to me.

Point 1 was proven to be a bare faced lie about an hour later, when Lentino’s office provided Radio Live with a copy of a legal document, signed by Kim Dotcom, in which he agrees he owed Lentino a debt for the rent payments on the mansion.  Lie one.  Hard proof.  End of.

Point 3 I know to be a lie.  As the recipient of the document in question, I can rule out that Jordan Williams was the source of it.  In fact, it was only during that radio show that I discovered Williams had any contact with Kim Dotcom at all, professional or otherwise.   Lie two.

Point 2, at this stage, we have Tony Lentino’s statement to the contrary.  With Kim in prison, it could hardly have been Kim who approached Lentino for help.   He said, he said, but I’m going with Lie 3.

3 statements, 3 lies.  

Jordan Williams also phoned in and categorically denied taking the document.  As Kim Dotcom recalls it, only three people had access to it.   But he forgets (?) the meeting of 10 to 12 people at which it was also distributed.

At best, Kim has a very shaky recollection of those facts.   At worst, he went on radio and pushed out three provable lies in short order.

It was extraordinary, and probably the best hour of talkback radio this year.

The same Friday, my request for an injunction on the further publication of any of the materials illegally taken from me was going before the courts, so I was generally distracted and thought no more of it.

That’s until 10:30 pm, Friday night.

Kim Dotcom phoned me.   This is the first time we have ever talked in any way.   Another extraordinary development on what was already an extraordinary Friday.

He wants to meet with me.  In private.   At his home, or neutral territory.   He wants me to keep it off the record and confidential until after the meeting.  Then, he says, I can decide if what I’m told should go public or not.

I told him it’s not how I do things.  We tentatively agreed to meet tomorrow, at a place and time yet to be discussed.

The weekend was spent winding down from an intense week, and chewing through Kim’s offer of a private meeting.

I’ve decided to decline.  If it is something I need to know, or it is an offer of some kind, if it can not be committed to an email, then I’m not sure I want to be in a situation of being seen meeting Kim Dotcom “in private” to be told or offered something that can’t be said over a phone or written down.

I’m still happy to meet Kim Dotcom for a formal interview.  In fact, I’m quite keen to meet him and have a long chat.  I’m also happy to respect any off-the-record portions of such a meeting, but I will not do it in secret.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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