60 hours community work? [POLL]

I find this extraordinary.  Caleb Harris reports:

A former Ministry of Transport manager sentenced for his second drink-driving charge in less than a year hopes others learn from his “fall from grace”.

Bruce Johnson, 47, was a key promoter of road safety with a 30-year public service career until he resigned last October after being caught drink-driving at more than double the legal limit in Martinborough, where he lives.

On August 2, less than four months after getting his licence back, he was again stopped while over the limit in the same town. A breath test showed 751 micrograms of alcohol per litre of breath. The legal limit is 400mcg.

Until last year’s conviction, Johnson was the ministry’s aviation and maritime group general manager.

He told The Dominion Post on Friday he had been unemployed since his resignation, and the conviction had cost him his job and career. He is getting professional help to deal with his drinking.

“My wish is that people see that it’s not just people that don’t care, or who are chronic alcoholics that put themselves in this situation . . . if anyone thinks that [drink-driving] is an issue that’s confined to a certain demographic, then they’re totally wrong.”

In Masterton District Court last week, Judge Barbara Morris sentenced him to 60 hours community work, nine months supervision, and disqualified him from driving for seven months.

His fall from grace, indeed.   What if a rape crisis counsellor had molested someone?   What if an accountant was involved in fraud?   What if a lawyer was caught stealing from clients?

Would they get 60 hours community service?

What do you think?

 

– Dominion Post


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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