Goverment expected to pay up for unwanted children

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Deirdre Mussen explains

Three children were enough for a mother who went into hospital to have her tubes tied in 1997. But she is now a mother of five, and says the botched sterilisation has had “huge financial implications”.

“They’re good kids, but if I had stopped at number three, I would be kicking up my heels now. Instead, I’ve still got child commitments.”

The woman is one of at least 11 pursuing ACC for the cost of raising children as a result of failed sterilisations.

In its most recent estimate, in 2011, Inland Revenue estimated the cost of raising a child until the age of 18 at $250,000. Wellington ACC lawyer John Miller, a father of four who is acting for the women, said: “Personally, I think that’s a bit light.”

The unnamed mother said the family had to buy a van to transport all the children, and she had lost earnings from staying at home to raise the unplanned child, who is now nearly 16.

She later had a fifth child before having a second – successful – operation to tie her fallopian tubes. Her two sons born after the failed sterilisation were dearly loved, and called themselves “miracle babies”. “They got through when no-one else would.”

I reckon ACC should just tell them they aren’t getting their payout but that there will be a CYFS van arriving at 3pm to collect the children to take them off their hands so they won’t have to deal with the inconvenience.  Imagine, after dinner, then can all “kick up their heels”.

 

– Stuff


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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