Kim Dotcom’s simultaneous glorification of hacking and slamming of state surveillance is blatant hypocrisy

So goes the subheading on a superb Listener editorial:

He has cleverly presented himself and the Internet Mana coalition as appealingly subversive – the sexiest place for young people wanting to shake up mainstream politicians. Beyond this, however, the platform is incoherent.

On what planet is it noble and ethical to deplore surveillance of private individuals by the state for security purposes, while at the same time glorifying the hacking of private individuals’ information by those with personal agendas, such as him?

On what planet would you then be part of a criminal conspiracy to hack a private citizen’s emails and have a very select few published in a book, leaked over the Internet and fed to the media?

Dotcom’s bragging of having hacked into Helmut Kohl’s financial rating and changing it because he didn’t like the then German Prime Minister caused the media coverage of IM’s campaign opening to degenerate into farce. The media was entirely right to ask questions about his personal ethics regarding the burgling of people’s private online information. The clear implication of Dotcom’s having boasted from the campaign launch stage about hacking Kohl is that he still regards it as pretty clever.

At the same time, he will later this month be wheeling up heavyweight anti-state-surveillance campaigners Glenn Greenwald and, by video link from abroad, Julian Assange, to ballast his own credibility. Hypocrisy abounds in any campaign, but this is the most blatant example this election.

But it will work.  You know why?  Because the media will lap it up.   There will be no filtering this through any kind of decency, or best-interest for the country kind of way.  The media love a circus, and Kim Dotcom is bringing the clowns.  

…all too often hacking is neither a harmless irritant nor a righteous tool to bring down evil-doers, but an abrogation of private citizens’ rights – and for no higher purpose than the egotism, malice or political agenda of the hacker concerned.

It will be a depressing statement about young voters in particular if many have their heads turned this election by the mega-monied Dotcom roadshow. His followers, about 2% of likely voters, should question both the legal lengths he has gone to in seeking to silence former confidants who would denounce his activities, and the enormity of a single individual sinking $3 million into a personal political vehicle simply because he feels disrespected by the Prime Minister. Those supporters should also look past the misdirection and hoopla and examine his business record, which is one that has massively disrespected other people’s “freedom” to be paid for their intellectual property.

Kim Dotcom is a genius.  No, he really is.  He’s proven time and time again he can create things out of nothing.  What he is not good at, is what happens next.  If you study his  life, you become aware of a pattern where he creates, and then it collapses.  Nothing he has done in his life has stood up and survived.

How depressing to think that only in New Zealand could such a self-serving agenda find the trusting naivety to prosper.

Most of us aren’t even self-aware enough to feel embarrassed about it.  Especially those in the media.

Nice to see that more and more people are seeing the man for what he is:  a very good con artist.

– The Listener


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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