Major changes to New Zealand domain names – .nz is coming!

 

Onlydomains.com

Major changes to New Zealand domain names – .nz is coming!

unnamed-1There have been some pretty big changes to the world of Internet addresses this year. New domains such as .xyz, .club, and .sex have now been released, meaning that people don’t have to worry so much if they missed out on their dream .com domain. Some of the biggest changes for Kiwi internet users have been the introduction of .Kiwi, and the even more important .nz. And OnlyDomains.com is here to help guide you through what this means both for people looking to register a new domain, and the 200,000 Kiwis who have already registered a New Zealand country code domain.

Up until now, kiwi websites had to have two levels, or two parts between the first dot and the end of the address – like whaleoil.CO.nz, or whaleoil.NET.nz. Now website owners have a choice and can skip the second level and go straight to the .nz – whaleoil.nz for example.

This new top-level country code for New Zealand is being released on September 30th and OnlyDomains.com has all of the answers for those affected. For people who have already registered a second-level domain such as .net.nz or .co.nz, your existing domain will put you in one of two categories:

Preferential Registration or Reservation (PRR)

This gives existing second-level domain registrants the right to register or reserve the matching top-level domain. For example, as the registrant of whaleoil.co.nz I can now go and register or reserve whaleoil.nz.

Registration can be done via OnlyDomains.com. To reserve your matching top-level domain for free for a period of up to two years, you will need to visit the Domain Name Commission at the site www.anyname.co.nz. Either option will require your UDAI. This is the passcode used by the registrant to make administrative changes to the set up of the domain they have registered.

Conflicted domains

This is when more than one second-level domain is registered with the same string. Eg: Whaleoil.net.nz and Whaleoil.co.nz. In this instance the following process applies:

From 1pm, 30 September 2014 you’ll be able to use an online tool at on anyname.nz to let the Domain Name Commission know whether you:

  • want to try and get the shorter version of your domain name
  • don’t think anyone should get it
  • don’t want it and don’t care who gets it
  • don’t think anyone should get it and think it should become its own second level like .co.nz, .org.nz or .school.nz.

Once all those involved in the conflict have lodged their preference, the Domain Name Commission will contact you and let you know the outcome. If a clear outcome doesn’t result, the Domain Name Commission may offer a facilitation service. After that, if there’s still no agreement on who’ll get the name, it will be unavailable for registration. 

To use the online tool at anyname.co.nz after 1pm, 30 September 2014, you will need your UDAI code. Your domain registrar will be able to provide this for you.

The shorter and more memorable top-level .nz domain structure opens up a range of new possibilities for registrants. Due to the infancy of this domain, many great new strings will be available for those who get in early, and OnlyDomains.com is the specialist Kiwi domain service here to help you through the process.

Onlydomains.com

 

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

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