Money doesn’t buy political influence

Here’s something interesting from Hamish Rutherford

A wealthy Waikato businessman who switched allegiance from National to the Conservatives donated $750,000 to Colin Craig’s party just days before the election.

Despite a high profile campaign and polls suggesting it was close to reaching the 5 per cent support required to bring MPs into Parliament, the Conservatives polled just over 4 per cent on election day.

While party leader Craig personally donated millions to the campaign, Electoral Commission records show Laurence and Katrina Day made two donations totalling $750,000 – on September 12 and 15. That brought their total since April 2013 to $1.425 million.

A long time supporter of the National Party who was chairman of the Hamilton East electorate for four years, Laurence Day switched his support to the Conservatives over its plan to make referendums binding on the government if backed by two-thirds of the voters. He did not return requests for comment last night.

The story of the Days and their departure from the National party is one that is still to be told one day.   

But the fascinating thing is that putting $750,000 into the Conservative Party bank account a week before the election is complete madness.  by then, all the budgets are spent, and putting more money in the account isn’t going to raise the limits on election spending.

Beyond that, even if the Conservative Party had made it to parliament, there is no way that Colin Craig could make binding referendums a bottom line.  Even by his own standards, he would need 67% support from the coalition parties, surely?

For the Day’s to dream that somehow getting Colin Craig into parliament would ever result in a binding referendums becoming part of the new government’s program is one thing, but to heave a lazy three quarter mil at Colin at the last few days of the election makes no sense at all.

 

– Stuff


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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