Photo Of The Day

Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands and islets that make up the Recherché Archipelago, a group of about 105 islands and over 1,200 ‘obstacles to shipping’. The tiny lake only spans about 600 meters wide but its rose pink colour is unmistakable. However, the reason why it’s pink remains a mystery.

Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News
Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands and islets that make up the Recherché Archipelago, a group of about 105 islands and over 1,200 ‘obstacles to shipping’. The tiny lake only spans about 600 meters wide but its rose pink colour is unmistakable. However, the reason why it’s pink remains a mystery.

Lake Hillier: Australian Natural Wonder

A Lake whose Pink Hue Defies Scientific Explanation

Lake Hillier is a bubble-gum-pink lake right on the edge of Recherché Archipelago’s largest island in Australia. It’s literally just a few steps away from a “normal” coloured Southern Ocean, but despite the pressure from its neighbour it refuses to compromise its pink colour. Scientists cannot figure out why Lake Hillier is pink, speculating that it’s caused by a reaction of sea salt and sodium bicarbonate (which you know as baking soda), or caused by red halophilic bacteria in the salt crusts. But, it is equally likely that there is a giant underwater strawberry farm.

Farm or not, you’re probably just wondering whether or not you can swim in Lake Hillier. Well, good news: as any Aussie will attest, it’s really just a salt lake; really salty, but perfectly safe to swim in. At the same time, being Australian toughens one up to swim in just about anything, including molten lava. I was unable to find any photographs of Aussies swimming in Lake Hillier, but that could be just because they are too tough to swim in a pink lake in the first place. Presumably their only use for this pink lake is to bottle and export it as treatment for non-Australian problems like upset stomachs, nausea, heartburn, diarrhea, and indigestion.

Lake Hillier has an area of ​​600 meters along the sand and surrounded by a dense forest of trees, the dunes and a variety of plants around the lake are separate from the Southern Ocean. The Water color of the lake is permanent and not a trick of the light, you can prove it by taking water and put it in a container and the pink color will still be visible because of settling permanently in the lake water.

The shallow briny lake is rimmed with white salt and encircled by dark green forests of eucalyptus and paperbark trees while the narrow strip of white dunes and sand separates the lake from the ocean’s deep waters. The first reported sighting dates back to the journals of Matthew Flinders, a British navigator and hydrographer in 1802. Flinders had climbed Middle Island’s highest peak (now known as Flinders Peak) to survey the surrounding waters when he came across this remarkable pink lake.

Whatever the cause for the colour, the water does not appear to pose any danger to humans. Though high salt levels might not make for the most comfortable swim, visitors hoping to immerse themselves in the lakes pink waters are perfectly safe to do so.

Lake Hillier is on an island and the only way to get there is via helicopter (Esperance Helitours) which is a 2 hour return flight from Esperance townsite

To see Lake Hillier on Google Maps, enter the following coordinates: 34°5’41″S 123°12’10″E (or just click here)

 

http://whenonearth.net/swim-in-lake-hillier-pink-lake-australia/

http://www.australia.com/explore/states/wa/pink-lake.aspx


Do you want:

  • Ad-free access?
  • Access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • Access to daily sudoku?
  • Access to Incite Politics magazine articles?
  • Access to podcasts?
  • Access to political polls?

Our subscribers’ financial support is the reason why we have been able to offer our latest service; Audio blogs. 

Click Here  to support us and watch the number of services grow.

48%