Photo Of The Day

© JIM MARSHALL PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC. San Francisco, 1968.  1965 TYPE 356 C: The 356 was Porsche’s first production model and had a nearly two-decade run as both a closed coupe and a convertible. This particular car is from the model’s last year of production and features a decidedly non-factory paint scheme, created at the request of famed singer Janis Joplin, who bought the car used and had it customized by a roadie for her band, Big Brother and the Holding Company. Apparently her friends were not the only ones who all drove Porsches.

© JIM MARSHALL PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC. San Francisco, 1968.
1965 TYPE 356 C: The 356 was Porsche’s first production model and had a nearly two-decade run as both a closed coupe and a convertible. This particular car is from the model’s last year of production and features a decidedly non-factory paint scheme, created at the request of famed singer Janis Joplin, who bought the car used and had it customized by a roadie for her band, Big Brother and the Holding Company. Apparently her friends were not the only ones who all drove Porsches.

“On stage, I make love to 25,000 different people, then I go home alone.”

 Janis was in LA, taping her final album, “Pearl”, in October of 1970.

After recording on the evening of the 3rd, she and band member Ken Pearson had a couple of drinks at Barney’s Beanery. Just after midnight, they drove back to the Landmark Hotel, at 7047 Franklin. Inside room 105, she shot up her last fix of heroin. She returned to the hotel lobby to get change for a five dollar bill, for cigarettes. She chatted casually with the hotel clerk, who later said she seemed perfectly natural (and he didn’t know who she was). When she returned to her room, she collapsed beside the bed, almost breaking her nose. She was wedged against a bedside table, with a cigarette in her hand.

John Cook, one of her band members, became alarmed when she didn’t show up for the recording session the next morning, and after unsuccessfully trying to reach her by telephone, he went to the hotel, broke down the door and found her dead. She was 27 years old. Janis had provided $1,500 dollars in her will for a funeral party, where The Grateful Dead performed for 200 of her friends.  (Copy of the invitation)

Janis was the skyrocket chick of the sixties, the woman who broke into the boys’ club of rock and out of the stifling good-girl femininity of postwar America. With her incredible wall-of-sound vocals, Joplin was the voice of a generation, and when she OD’d on heroin, a generation’s dreams crashed and burned with her.

Released four months after her death Joplin’s album Pearl ended up being the defining record in the revolutionary singer’s career, as well as an ellipsis suggesting what might have been.

It held down the #1 position for nine weeks in 1971. It included “Me and Bobby McGee,” a song written for her by ex-lover Kris Kristofferson. A quixotic portrait of a countercultural love affair, sung by Joplin as an affectionate, road-weary country blues, “Me and Bobby McGee” perfectly captured the bohemian spirit of the times. The powerful performances on Pearl, including “Move Over,” “Half Moon” and “Get It While You Can,” hint at what might have come from Joplin had she not died at 27.

Janis Joplin has passed into the realm of legend: an outwardly brash yet inwardly vulnerable and troubled personality who possessed one of the most passionate voices in rock history. It could be argued that her legacy has as much to do with her persona as her singing. Music journalist Ellen Wills asserted that “Joplin belonged to that select group of pop figures who mattered as much for themselves as for their music. Among American rock performers, she was second only to Bob Dylan in importance as a creator-recorder-embodiment of her generation’s mythology.”

Rock critic Lillian Roxon summed up her influence with these words: “[Janis Joplin] perfectly expressed the feelings and yearnings of the girls of the electric generation – to be all woman, yet equal with men; to be free, yet a slave to real love; to [reject] every outdated convention, and yet get back to the basics of life.”

 

http://rockhall.com/inductees/janis-joplin/bio/


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