What about Rawshark then?

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I realise few care, but at some point a crime was committed.  A crime that has been acceptable to media, to politicians and a large part of the country as a crime that was “for the common good”.

And the theft of emails and private conversations doesn’t really scream harm or damages.  It’s hard to get any kind of sympathy as it is seen as pretty much something like bumping your knee.  Just flinch and get over it.  Not like anyone died here.  

So the precedent has been set.  Theft and use of private information is totally acceptable as long as it can be used in some way that is for the greater good.  Public interest.

No matter that it required a crime to obtain it.  That’s apparently irrelevant.  As long as media are at arms-length, their use of the proceeds of a crime is in the clear.

I know the police are doing their best.  But I’m not hopeful that it will come to much if anything.  It took me going to court for an injunction for Whaledump and the larger media to stop.  I was hopeful the Police would get involved in some way.  Or the Privacy Commission.

Of course, by then, there wasn’t much left to publish that was in the public interest.  Whaledump demonstrated that over the remaining days as highly private and personal conversations were leaked that had nothing to do with government, and everything to do with character assassination.

It eats away at me that for a good month politicians, media and invested parties tried to do everything to destroy Whaleoil.  It was clear that this was the original objective.  Trying to tie it to John Key in some way was really a secondary aim.

So here I am, far from destroyed.  Blog is going gangbusters.  More and more people have come to understand that the way Whaleoil has been presented by the Media and politicians is far from objective.  They all have an interest in seeing me go away.

But I can’t help being frustrated that there are a bunch of people that are going to get away with it.  Any interest in finding out who Rawshark is, or who s/he fed information to, or who paid for any or all of it appears to have disappeared.

All I can say is that if this is the precedent, then media can come get everything you hold dear as long as they can justify public interest.  All they have to do is have an arms-length relationship with people that are happy to get what they need and break the law on their behalf.

Dirty Politics exposed the fact that parties leak to bloggers, as well as traditional media.  Something that is legal.

What is going under the radar is Dirty Media is happy to benefit from crime, rather than assist the public and police in finding out who is behind it all.  Of course, don’t expect media to expose themselves for tactics such as these.

It’s your right to know, and the end justifies the means.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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