Teacher Unions still whinging, time to consider de-registration

The teacher unions are never happy.

Despite a resounding majority victory, the first in the world under an MMP electoral system, the NZEI is claiming that John Key doesn’t have a mandate.

The largest teachers’ union in the country says it will continue to fight against the Government’s plans to reform the education system, despite the weekend’s historic election landslide.

In winning 48 percent of the vote, National became the first party to win an outright majority in Parliament under MMP. But New Zealand Educational Institute (NZEI) national secretary Paul Goulter says that doesn’t necessarily give them a mandate to implement the $359 million Investing in Educational Success (IES) scheme.

“I don’t think there could be any evidence at all to say that parents and communities and teachers in any way support it on the Monday after the election, compared to the Friday before the election. There’s just no evidence of that,” he said on Firstline this morning.

Mr Goulter says parents voted on “bread-and-butter matters”, not individual policies.

Under IES, expert teachers will get up to $20,000 extra pay, and principals up to $40,000. The catch is they would have to spend time away from their usual school to help out others the Government deems are struggling.
In August, 93 percent of NZEI members who took part in a vote on IES rejected it. Three-quarters wanted it dumped altogether, with the rest wanting it retooled.

Mr Goulter says the Government might have a mandate to push ahead with IES if it supplied evidence that it will actually improve educational outcomes.

“The evidence that they’ve bowled up so far is quite frankly pathetic,” he says. “As far as we’re concerned, things like mandates have to be subject to evidence and bringing parents and communities along, and that hasn’t happened.”

Good lord, if National doesn’t have a mandate then what on earth would Labour have had with barely 25% of the vote?

These morons live in la-la land.

Whoever is the new Education minister they need to rinse these guys, and perhaps look at de-registration and the formation of two unions to compete with each  in each sector.

It is obvious that they are a union in name only and instead are the union wing of the Labour party. Their team lost convincingly, time for them to shut up and do what they are told.

he New Zealand Post Primary Teachers’ Association so far has welcomed IES, but Mr Goutler says that might not last as the membership is yet to have its say.

“To date they have, but of course the way they’ve run their particular approach to this, their package has to go out to their membership and that’s going to happen in a few weeks’ time, so it’s probably a bit premature to say that at this stage.”

But despite opposing the scheme, Mr Goulter says industrial action is unlikely – instead, schools will just refuse to take part unless the Government legislates to make it compulsory.

“This is an issue that needs to be worked out through communities and parents, and in schools itself, so it’s not appropriate to do that. What this will mean in practise is that schools will not partake in this experiment, and as a result it will tend to stall.

“It’s a bit like National Standards where the Government was forced to legislate for it. I understand from John Key in other interviews, that he’s not intending to do that.

Someone needs to tell these union numpties they are state sector civil servants and they implement government policy whether they like it or not.

If they decided to ignore policy then the government needs to make and example of them.

 

– 3News


Do you want:

  • Ad-free access?
  • Access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • Access to daily sudoku?
  • Access to Incite Politics magazine articles?
  • Access to podcasts?
  • Access to political polls?

Our subscribers’ financial support is the reason why we have been able to offer our latest service; Audio blogs. 

Click Here  to support us and watch the number of services grow.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

48%