King: The 1980s were much worse

If you ever needed a sign in 2014 that your party needs rejuvenation, it’s your deputy leader telling the press that “The 1980s were much worse” [for Labour].

Labour’s caucus met [yesterday] and its former leader David Cunliffe resigned while David Parker was elevated from deputy leader to acting leader with Annette King as his deputy.

Ms King denied it was the most torrid time faced by Labour in her experience.

“The 1980s were much worse,” she said.

“Whenever there is a loss by a party there is going to be a time of turbulence. I have to say I’ve been there and seen that before. We will get through it, and we will come out of it and will be a strong party. This isn’t a permanent position.”

Mr Parker said he and Ms King – “the grandmother of the party now” – were chosen because they could offer stability and impartiality in the interim.

Seriously, when you have a grandmother of the party, you’re screwed.  This may not even be a two-term fix.  This may end up being a three term fix.  

Asked if Prime Minister John Key should be worried about facing the interim partnership of Mr Parker and Ms King, when Parliament reconvenes next month, Mr Parker laughed and said, “I don’t think so”.

“We are the same people we were before the election, sadly, because we haven’t bought many new people into Parliament,” he said.

Well.  Hello Sherlock.   Hit from both ends at once:  by not retiring dead wood and by not bringing on new talent.  The Labour Party is a collection of fossils with last-century expectations, last-century thinking, and last-century solutions to problems that, at times, don’t even exist.

There.  No need for a review.

 

– Claire Trevett, NZ Herald


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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