DEVELOPING: Flight QZ8501 off-radar [CLOSED]

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In summary

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  • Jdogg

    Was just reading the “news” and noted “Mustofa said the plane had asked for an unusual route before it lost contact.”
    Gotta hope for the best and hope the passengers and flight staff are bought home safe.

    • Teletubby

      This caught my eye as well. I have been checking all sorts of news sites for any further explanation of this but can’t see one.

      • Aucky

        CNN is all over it.

        • Frank The Ranga

          A lot of weather along the route with thunderstorm activity up to 45000ft, 6000 above max altitude for an A320.

          • Hans

            Well above ceiling of all but some military acft and one or two business jet types.

    • colinrippey

      Pretty normal to ask for diversion left or right of track for weather. You try not to go through areas of amber or red on your radar and these can be quite extensive in the area concerned.

      • Jdogg

        When I read the breaking news from three different overseas sites, none had expanded on the context, I see the context has been added.. I suppose this would be quite an active area for thunderstorms at this time of year too?

  • Alright

    Well done WO. But I’m reading between lines right now.

  • Yeahright

    Travelling to Hong Kong once I was spell bound by the share amount of lightning out of my window in this area of concern.
    In saying this the Weather Radar on board should let them avoid the storm by going around or above, One thing that Weather Radar cannot see is icing, in a tropical climate like this it could of flown around the storm and flown into severe icing…….
    Hope they are OK! Thoughts with them.

    • Alright

      Three hours overdue? It cant possibly end well.

    • Dave

      If it looked like Icing was a problem, they can add additives to the fuel (during refuelling) to stop icing. For years RNZAF have added Icinol to JetA1 to prevent icing of fuel.

      • Yeahright

        Not icing of fuel, of the control surfaces. Even modern technology cannot handle sudden onset of severe icing, de-icing boots should be able break the ice off, but planes are very aerodynamic and a little offset at max altitude doesn’t give you much leeway of stall airspeed, controllability.

  • Champagneshane

    they weren’t that long into the flight.They would have been heavy which limits the ceiling so that leaves going around….looking at some of the weather maps, storm cells everywhere…they may have just got unlucky whereas the other aircraft were lucky.

    • Hans

      You do realise you can’t go over cb clouds, don’t you? So there only ever was one option: going around them.

      • Champagneshane

        Thats right…. Like in the Air France case. Also an Airbus, (A330 in that case) fly by wire. That tragedy was a result of storm weather mid ocean not unlike events unfolding now. They could have gone over but were too heavy to do so and ended up flying into the weather although there’s much more to the ultimate demise of the flight that was very technical

        • Hans

          I think you may be missing a point here. You simply cannot “go over” a cb cloud no matter what civilian aircraft you are flying (let the Concorde be an irrelevant exception). Much less so in the tropics, where the tops of the cb clouds routinely reach over 50 000 feet

    • colinrippey

      Not really the scale needed for anything but supporting that weather may have been a factor. As I read it, this forecast valid about 5 hours after the event (weather could change over that period but there would still probably be problematic weather en-route)

  • Cowgirl

    This appears to be an extraordinary amount of information considering the unknown fate of the plane. I don’t recall ever seeing a passenger manifest so early in the piece before – is this a new protocol following the shambles of MH370?

    • Rick H

      It is written up above that the plane “WAS” an air . .. . .
      That sounds bad already.

      • Cowgirl

        The past tense being used is never a good sign – seems like they know more than they are letting on. Whatever the outcome, I hope it is a speedy resolution for the families’ sake.

  • Ratchette

    Let’s not get ahead of the truth. Suspect bad weather is the culprit.

    NZ herald gets it wrong as usual, plane flying 32,000 ft and 161 passengers including crew. World media has 162 passengers including crew, 34,000 ft.
    Phzzzz.

    • Cowgirl

      Herald has 162 in the headline in some places, but still 161 in the body of the text. *sigh*

      • Ratchette

        ‘Sigh’ is right.
        I read UK, Australian and US on-line ‘papers’. I travel a bit. Often I return to New Zealand with a selection of Newspapers. Right now I have The Australian, A broad sheet. Plenty of quality items accompanied with some discrete advertising, cost AU$2.50.
        At the coffee shop this afternoon, I ‘read’ their copy of the Sunday Herald, NZ$3.00. Who on earth would pay three dollars for that trash ?

        • Richard McGrath

          I agree. I work in Aussie frequently, and The Australian is the only paper I would consider reading. Trouble is, the papers they sell where I work are twice the normal price and are a week out of date.

  • Imogen B

    Whatever happened the outcome is the same for those on board. God rest their souls. Sympathy to the families and friends of those who have perished.

  • HSV325

    Very sad for those on board and their families. Let’s hope the plane is found so the familes can at least have some closure

  • TonyM

    Hopefully tracking equipment is switched on this time.

  • Diddly_Squat

    Surely it can’t be that hard for the Herald to show a pic of an AirAsia Airbus A320-200, rather than the one they have up, an Indonesia AirAsia Airbus A320-216

    • Another Middleagedwhiteguy

      Would they know the difference?
      And if they did they wouldn’t care, as they know absolutely that no-one else would even notice so who cares.
      Typical MSM attitude.

  • MaryLou

    How prescient – doco on History channel just started, re Malaysia Airlines flight. Hopefully the families will at least get some answers this time.

  • Dave

    Pete, Cam and others, a view of the wind in that area, its strong but not Cat5 Cyclone material, and it might illistrate why the pilot requested a strange route.

    http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/orthographic=-257.11,1.19,2048

  • Lapuamagnum

    Did a flight with them last week. If they had more leg room they would be looking for less people.

  • colinrippey

    I am, of course, not a mod but I am at a bit of a loss to discern why a timeline of 2014 air accidents is in any way relevant to :

    “DEVELOPING: Flight QZ8501 off-radar [LIVE BLOG] ”

    Not much different to the sins, rightly castigated on this blog, of the Horrid.

  • Champagneshane

    Despite some minor criticism expressed below WO is heads and shoulders above other media in reporting this very dynamic event. There are some striking similarities to Air France 447 some years ago; weather related (most likely) an Airbus fly by wire ( A330) requests for route change, nasty weather en route, heavy aircraft limiting diversion options.

  • john Doe

    Thanks team for the live news and updates on what looks like another airline tragedy. It is of interest that all major international airline incidents in 2014 involved Eastern, Middle East or African airlines.

    • Another Middleagedwhiteguy

      “Mere statistics” . . . but 2014 does not stand alone in this.
      Your choice who you fly with.

  • Aucky

    The Jakarta Post is on to it. Good coverage. http://www.thejakartapost.com

  • zotaccore

    Just last week I flew from Brisbane to Dubai in an A380, a trip I’ve done many times, and for the bulk of the flights over India the aircraft has either climbed or made turns to go around bad weather – it’s not an unusual thing for this to happen – as it is a night flight one can see the sky lighting up over long distances. Although conjecture, it’s possible the deviation was not enough for the aircraft to miss the bad weather and something catastrophic happened. Time will tell (hopefully).

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