Giving the wahine the bash still a national sport for Maori

Maori women are more likely to become assault victims than other New Zealanders, police data shows.

Recorded crime victim statistics, recently released by police, showed about one in five assault victims in the last four months was a Maori woman. Yet they make up just 7 per cent of the population.

A family member, such as a partner, ex-partner, parent or sibling, was the most likely person to carry out the assault.

The figures, previously only available to police and some policy makers, show the various permutations of crime and its victims.

For Europeans, Asians and Indians, men were more likely to be assaulted than women, but for Pacific Islanders and Maori, women were more likely to be victims.

Family violence rates for Pacific Islanders were almost double those of Europeans and Asians. Maori were not far behind.

That Maori women were over-represented in crime victimhood statistics was not surprising, Victim Support chief executive Kevin Tso said.

“It’s very indicative of the stats we’ve seen and the work we actually engage in,” he said.

Trends were not always easy to determine, but the victimisation of Maori women had emerged in other research, including the recently released Glenn Inquiry.

It was something Victim Support dealt with every day.

“This topic . . . goes to the core of our New Zealand demographic and cultural issues in our society,” Tso said.

Regional figures showed race-based victimisation was widespread.

Once were Warriors.


It remains pointless to look at these statistics without actually delving into the causes.

Is most of this drug and alcohol fueled?  Or is it down to genetic or cultural inheritance?


– Charlie Mitchell, The Press

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.