Ice free Arctic? Not anytime soon

Remember the claims by warmists, that the turning point had been reached, that the Arctic would be ice free by 2012?

Yeah, not happening.

While global warming seems to have set the polar north on a path to floe-free summers, the latest data from Europe’s Cryosat mission suggests it may take a while yet to reach those conditions.

The spacecraft observed 7,500 cu km of ice cover in October when the Arctic traditionally starts its post-summer freeze-up.

This was only slightly down on 2013 when 8,800 cu km were recorded.

Two cool summers in a row have now allowed the pack to increase and then hold on to a good deal of its volume.

And while the ice is still much reduced compared with the 20,000 cu km that used to stick around in the Octobers of the early 1980s, there is no evidence to indicate a collapse is imminent.

“What we see is the volume going down and down, but then, because of a relatively cool summer, coming back up to form a new high stand,” said Rachel Tilling from the UK’s Nerc Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM) at University College London (UCL).

“So, what may be occurring here is a decline that looks a bit like a sawtooth, where we can lose volume but then recover some of it if there happens to be a shorter melt season one year,” she told BBC News.

The British researcher is presenting her work this week at the American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Cryosat is the European Space Agency’s (Esa) dedicated polar monitoring platform.

We are well past the predicted ice free status of the Arctic.




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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.