Did #illridewithyou turn into #iliedtoyou?

It seems that the media and the lefty luvvies who were dead kent to hug a muslim had been sold a pup with the so-called #illridewithyou rubbish.

I had a discussion with someone on Thursday about this, and I was suspicious of the whole Twitter meme…likening it to #kony2012.

Slacktivism at its worst.

It seems I was right, with the woman credited with the originating story that lead to the creation of the hashtag  now confessing to lying about her encounter.

GAPS have appeared in the story that inspired the #illridewithyou Twitter phenomenon.

University lecturer [and former Greens candidate] Rachael Jacobs had originally posted a status on Facebook, explaining how she offered to protect a woman who felt uncomfortable wearing her hijab.

According to her story, Ms Jacobs had seen the woman beginning to remove her scarf, and ran after her, saying “Put it back on. I’ll walk with you.”

The exchange took place on a Brisbane train, while the Sydney siege was taking place in Sydney’s Martin Place.

But did a “conversation” actually occur?

It seems not. The Brisbane Times reports a different story:

By sheer fluke, we got off at the same station, and some part of me decided saying something would be a good thing. Rather than quiz her about her choice of clothing, I thought if I simply offered to walk her to her destination, it might help.

It’s hard to describe the moment when humans, and complete strangers, have a conversation with no words. I wanted to tell her I was sorry for so many things – for overstepping the mark, for making assumptions about a complete stranger and for belonging to a culture where racism was part of her everyday experience.

But none of those words came out, and our near silent encounter was over in a moment.

If something walks like a duck and quacks like a duck it probably is a duck. In this case this duck is a load of b.s.

Finally Rachael Jacobs fesses up.

However Rachael Jacobs has admitted that she “editorialised’’ parts of her story.

“Confession time. In my Facebook status, I editorialised. She wasn’t sitting next to me. She was a bit away, towards the other end of the carriage,” she wrote.

Detailing her thought process, Ms Jacobs now says she wondered if she even needed to help.“She might not even be Muslim or she could have just been warm!,” she wrote.

The hashtag continues to divide people on social media, with some lauding it as Australia’s way of combating Islamophobia.

Others say it detracts from the real tragedy of two people being murdered at Martin Place.

Editorialised? Does she mean made stuff up…because that i generally what that means.

I’m with those who think that the hashtag moved focus onto feeling sorry for the Muslim community rather than the victims of a jihadist nutter intent on carnage.

Andrew Bolt thinks so too.

What made this #illridewithyou so offensive is that it deflected sympathy from the hostages – still in captivity – to those who shared the jihadists’ faith, and that it presumed Australians were so racist that they’d go on a pogrom (which, yet again, they did not).

The leftists love this sort of slacktivism, it makes them feel good, but how many of those tweeting the hastag actually did ride with a Muslim…I suspect not one.

 

– The Australian, Brisbane Times


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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