Peter Dunne dodged a bullet, and can maintain his self righteousness even though he doesn’t deserve it


via Stuff

Legal highs.   We are so lucky we stopped this insane experiment.  In a sense.

The number of deaths linked to the use of so-called legal highs in England have increased eightfold in three years, new figures show.

In 2009 12 people died after taking the drugs, compared to to 97 in 2012.

Think-tank the Centre for Social Justice (CSJ), which revealed the statistics, has called on the Government to grant police more powers to close shops selling the dangerous drugs.

The group say the UK has the highest rate of legal highs use among young people in Europe, and said police and courts should be given new powers to close the ‘head shops’ which sell many of the substances.

The CSJ is asking the Government to implement legislation similar to laws introduced in Ireland in 2010, which saw the number of head shops in the country fall from more than 100 to less than 10.

The organisation also revealed that the number of people in treatment in England for taking legal highs has jumped by 216 per cent over the last five years, rising from 738 in 2009/10 to 2,339 last year

CSJ director Christian Guy said: ‘This is yet another wake-up call to the dangers of so-called ‘legal highs’.

‘Legal highs are destroying lives – it is time to get tough on those making a living out of selling them.

How many people die of Marijuana use?

We dodged a bullet here, and we should never recommence the sale of these products again.

There is a lovely natural solution to this.  But somehow nobody feels that’s the answer.

Killing people with Legal Highs apparently is.

Logic is absent here.

– Daily Mail

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.