Photo Of The Day

Photo: Google Earth. A long swirled wake was spotted on Google Earth in Oke Bay, part of the Bay of Islands in New Zealand.

Photo: Google Earth.
A long swirled wake was spotted on Google Earth in Oke Bay, part of the Bay of Islands in New Zealand.

Too big to be a shark and too fast for a whale…

So what is the mystery creature captured by Google Earth off the coast of New Zealand?

  • Engineer Pita Witehira spotted a large unexplained wake about a week ago
  • He was looking at Oke Bay, in the Bay of Islands, an area on the east coast of the Far North District of New Zealand’s North Island
  • It wasn’t caused by a boat because there is no white foam from a motor 
  • Mr Witehira also doesn’t think a shark or whale could have caused it

A giant mystery sea creature is thought to have been spotted in the turquoise waters of one of New Zealand’s most idyllic bays.

A huge unexplained wake can be seen in a Google Earth image of Oke Bay, in the Bay of Islands, an area on the east coast of the Far North District of the country’s North Island, captured by satellite at about 11.30am on January 30.

Engineer Pita Witehira, who spotted the wake while on Google Earth researching for his holiday home, told Daily Mail Australia the wake could have been left by a creature around 12 metres in size.

Mr Witehira, from Hamilton, New Zealand, said: ‘The Native Maori would call this a “Taniwha” (‘Troll’) as it appears not to be a whale and it is far too big to be a shark. It is moving too fast and turning too sharply to be a whale.’

Mr Witehira also ruled out that a boat was the cause of the wake because there is no white froth like normal wakes created by motors.

‘I spotted it about a week ago. We have some property near Oke Bay and I’m about to build a beach chalet up there, I zoomed down and found that,’ he said.

‘It’s way too wide for a shark and way too long… It’s got to have a lot of weight under the water to create that kind of drag.’ Oke Bay has a quite white sand beach and the water stays shallow for around 40 metres ‘with a sudden deep drop into the bay’.

‘There is a lot of undergrowth in the deeper parts of the Bay,’ Mr Witehira explained.

 Daily Mail

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