Whaleoil Backchat

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  • [MOD] Evening. Over the last few days there has been a definite and obvious upsurge in comments. Although that’s great, it has also seen the return of the pointless one liners, the self gratification, the sycophantic admiration of blog/owner/staff, and even the return of some problem children that didn’t last very many comments before being blocked again.

    At this end of the screen, it’s good to see everyone relax and have a good time. But. (There has to be a but). It’s slowly turning back into a free-for-all. Moderators have started to act, and after weeks of extremely light moderation where perhaps only half a dozen comments were removed on a given day, we’re now staring at having to get involved on most articles.

    Whaleoil is looking for quality over quantity. Unless your comment adds new information or a different perspective, it is at risk of being removed.

    Comments are moderated in the same spirit as the article they are made on. So, if the article is light hearted, moderators will apply a very course filter. But on serious topics, we’re looking for serious contributions.

    If your comments are regularly deleted by moderators, or you find a whole bunch gone at once, you can consider yourself extremely close to being put into the sin bin for some time.

  • New Disqus feature

    For a while now it has irritated me that certain people can “follow” you, but you couldn’t get rid of them. There still isn’t a way to block people from following you again after you removed them, but at least you can clean out the follow list if you want to.

    Instructions are here: https://disqus.com/home/channel/discussdisqus/discussion/channel-discussdisqus/new_feature_remove_unwanted_followers/

  • Carl

    pic.

  • Nige.

    Two days, two emotions, two songs….one problem.

    A warning that the video for the second song is quite confronting. There is raw footage of atrocities and war crimes.

  • Isherman

    Oh no..que more TV time with Winston doing his serious face..I wish they would get all of the problems resolved just to keep him from the telly..

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/64245750/cook-strait-ferry-aratere-breaks-down-again

  • Muffin

    well the rain stopped and the sun came out, so I chucked in work for the day feeling great, then I heard about the kids killed in Pakastan and now it all just feels so hollow somehow. How someone kills children, any children, of any race or creed is beyond me, how does hate get to the point you will do that? If that is the resolve of the enemy then its going to be a long fight to see them off.

    • Whafe

      I agree, can see that these people have nil logic and they perhaps see children still as possible soldiers. None the less, it still renders me speechless in that children can be murdered like this. Words cannot describe this abominable behaviour

  • Karma

    Apologies if this is a daft question (i.e. something everyone knows but me!) has Russell Norman renounced his Australian citizenship and become a fully fledged, passport carrying NZer?

    • Yes he has. You can’t stand for parliament unless you are a New Zealander.

      • ex-JAFA

        Yes, but do you know if he’s renounced his Oz citizenship? NZ allows dual citizenship, but does Oz? e.g. China doesn’t allow dual citizenship.

        • Dave

          Yes, i believe its against under the Geneva convention to force someone to renounce their original citizenship. ?

        • Platinum Fox

          According to wiki (therefore unverified):

          “With effect from 4 April 2002, there are no restrictions (under Australian law) on Australians holding the citizenship of another country.”

          and

          “since 1 July 2007 former Australian citizens who lost citizenship […] are generally able to apply for resumption of Australian citizenship”

          and

          “Between 26 January 1949 and 3 April 2002, an adult Australian generally lost Australian citizenship automatically (section 17 of the Australian Citizenship Act 1948) upon acquisition of another citizenship …”.

          So, it seems to me that if Russole took NZ citizenship before 3 April 2002 he lost his Aussie citizenship, but he can get it back if he passes a good character test. If he became an NZ citizen after 4 April 2002 then he didn’t lose his Aussie citizenship automatically and must use an Australian passport when he re-enters Australia.
          I’ve not found anything that shows that an Aussie citizen can voluntarily revoke their citizenship and it be recognised as valid. I have a vague recollection that Australia has a global taxation reach for its citizens.

      • Karma

        Dang it! I was looking for an out clause for us. I blame Russell Crowe. He becomes an Aussie citizen and they send us an equally obnoxious twit to take his place.

        • Dave

          Russel Crowe is not an Aussie citizen, they rejected him. he should have applied before the Clarke government forced the Aussies hands.

          http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/entertainment/sydney-confidential/russell-crowe-loses-fight-to-become-australian-citizen-due-to-immigration-loophole/story-fni0cvc9-1226670498096

          • Chris EM

            Crikey, disowned by New Zealand and rejected by Australia.
            He and Dotcom must feel empathy for each other.

          • Karma

            Thanks for clarifying that. Here’s hoping the Crowe doesn’t ever come home to roost. Russell Norman is barely tolerable as it is. As a complete aside, growing up as child of the 80s we used to call people a Norman as an insult. Interesting that the criteria for being called that hasn’t changed in the ensuing years.

          • The2Game

            The first election I was eligible to vote in, Norman ‘Big Norm’ Kirk led Labour to a landslide win…

            He’d be horrified, I reckon, at his latterday namesake’s antics…

    • Cadwallader

      This isn’t a daft topic at all. There are many Australians who have become NZ’ers. I am one of them. The longer I remain here no matter how many visits I make to various parts of OZ I can never imagine living there…after 40+ years. I’d be Ok with being buried in my hometown cemetery but that will be soon enough. There are lots of reasons that make NZ more attractive than OZ.
      1 Less layers of government.
      2 Smaller tax burden.
      3 No tyrannies of distance.
      4 No snakes/crocodiles.
      5 Fewer Islamos (?)
      etc…

      • dgrogan

        6 Too darned hot
        7 No mountains [Mt Kosciuszko is a poor imitation]
        But #4 is enough to keep me on this side of the Tasman

        • Nige.

          8 Less bureaucracy in general.
          9 My sister doesn’t live here

          • OT Richter

            10. No Pauline Hansen (although we do have Hone).

      • Cadwallader

        Truth is: I am actually Tasmanian. Shhh!

        • Nige.

          hmmm strange. Your avatar only has one head.

          • Cadwallader

            Mmmmmh but I am yet to meet a virgin!

          • Dave

            Yes, you were unlikely to meet too many in Aussie, especially in Tassie!

          • Cadwallader

            I was told (by a Kiwi) that the definition of a Tasmanian virgin is a 9 year old who can climb further up a tree than her father.

          • [MOD] looking the other way….

          • FredFrog

            Tasmania….Where all family trees are straight lines……

          • SVlover

            Ha, ha. I was too scared to mention that!

        • SVlover

          Well that explains a lot! Anywhere would be better! This from an ex-Melbournian and sent in the happy spirit of State camaraderie.

      • I.M Bach

        In reference to item 3; when we first arrived in Oz I asked a workmate what he thought might be the best vehicle to travel across Australia in. He replied “a Boeing”. Some Aussies do have a sense of humour.

    • The2Game

      Every time I see or hear Wussell (and, believe me, I try to avoid such unhappy occurrences!) he seems to carrying or mentioning the Tibetan flag…

      Maybe he’s a Tibetan national as well…

  • LabTested

    There is a major story unfolding in Russia this week with the currency practically in free fall. The Central Bank has been spending Billions trying to prop up the ruble, but they are down to their last $400B in foreign reserves, so appear to have given up. They need to use these reserves to bail out banks who no longer have access to western capital markets due to sanctions over Ukraine.

    On Tuesday the Russian Central Bank increased interest rates from 10.5% to 17% overnight in an attempt to support the ruble.

    This is madness & desperation. I was working in a bank in the UK on Black Wednesday (1992) when the British government increased rates from 10% to 15% in an attempt to support the fixed FX rate. We had business owners calling the bank saying come get the keys to the factory. I’m closing the doors.

    This year the Ruble has fallen 56% against the $ and the Russian economy is now smaller than Texas & 1/2 the size of Italy.

    Evans-Pritchard explains.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/11297770/Russia-risks-Soviet-style-collapse-as-rouble-defence-fails.html

    • Korau

      Part of the problem for Russia is the falling oil price a good portion of Russia’s income is from oil). Allied to the damage done by the Ukraine sanctions. Oil has dropped again today ( http://home.nzcity.co.nz/finance/sharemarket/company.aspx?symbol=WESTEX&i=history ) so I guess their troubles (like troubles everywhere) are multiplying.

      What are the consequences for NZ if Russia starts to default?

      • Platinum Fox

        I don’t believe Russia still manufactures Ladas, so unlikely that it will be bartering for milk powder with that particular commodity again!

      • LabTested

        It is not looking likely that Russian will default in the short term. They have $400B in foreign reserves & Russian banks need to refinance $130B, over the next 12 months, so can borrow from the government. Ordinary Russians are spending what cash they have on new cars etc to get rid of their Rubles. Then the economy will collapse.

        Putin is backed into a corner. The US has announced increased sanctions. Question is how is Putin going to react. He has no obvious face saving way out. Possibly he will double down in the Ukraine or elsewhere while he still has the support of the Russian people.

        • Isherman

          You’re right, but I bet he’s glad he recently concluded the 30 year oil and gas pipeline supply contract with China. Once the folks have spent up on imported goods in the short term before inflation takes off, if there is a run on the banks say early next year it could still be pretty grim for a period.

      • Kopua Cowboy

        They’ll just offer a nuclear sub or some tanks to pay their debt again.

    • Effluent

      Should make Russian exports very cheap, but can anyone tell me what Russian products might be worth buying at any price? This is not a facetious question.

      • Carl

        Vodka?

      • Jp

        caviaer

      • caochladh

        I think you will find that prices for goods ex Russia are quoted in US$.

        • Disinfectant

          But any savvy purchaser will insist on paying in roubles or at a very much reduced $U.S. price.

          • caochladh

            Good luck with that one!

      • Disinfectant

        Rocket engines which NASA has had to buy for many years as they concede that the Russian ones are far superior.
        Strange old world we live in.

        • Isherman

          That goes back decades, In 1959, Nixon(vice pres. at that point) himself admitted as much to Khruschev during his visit to the US.

      • OT Richter

        A wife.

    • DemocKot

      Yes a interesting situation which will affect a lot of ordinary russians, a sad example of a failure to build a mercantile economy based on the oil revenues due to the political situation there.When the ruble collapsed in 1998 the russian central bank raised its rates from 30% to 150%!!!! so its still no where as bad yet and russia has lot of money in reserve unlike 1998.

      .More here http://economistsview.typepad.com/timduy/2014/12/ip-russia.html

      • Disinfectant

        But if those reserves are overseas reserves they no longer have access to them due to western sanctions because of the Ukraine.

        • DemocKot

          No sure about that but I understand they can access it and I am informed there is $45 billion in gold Russia also produces lots of gold) and remember Gazprom and rosneft can pay some of their bills from cash flow from the oil they sell as well.

    • unitedtribes

      The perfect storm. Oil collapse and the Ukraine problem

    • Disinfectant

      I was there in 1992 as well.
      Overnight interest rates went to about 83%.
      The Bank of England sold all its Gold reserves.
      Sterling then fell out of the “exchange rate mechanism”, an artificial European impost to bring about parity in currencies throughout Europe.
      Sterling then devalued quickly to find its tradeable value again.
      Edit: spelling.

    • ozbob68

      Just saw this on BBC News. Apple has ceased online trading in Russia as the rouble is too volatile to set prices accurately. Now when you mess with peoples online music, then you get their attention!

      http://www.bbc.com/news/business-30510969

    • essiep

      What does this mean for Fonterra/NZ Inc?

  • Isherman

    Maybey she shouldn’t have said ‘right in the kisser’…

  • willtin

    It’s AUT graduation week and today, we had the privilege to witness our son receiving his double degree. Sitting in the audience and watching the procession of graduands graduating was uplifting to my ageing spirit. Our future looks good, was the feeling I got.

    • dgrogan

      Congratulations, W. You are obviously a justifiably proud parent.

  • Joe_Bloggs

    Soooo, a foreign accent will get you off a ticket on NZ roads???

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11375738

    Not quite sure how that works but this Kiwi’s working on Irish this evening…

  • mommadog

    For those bacon lovers at WO looking for a little something else to fill the stocking with – bacon headbands.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/fashion/64209132/bacon-headbands-and-squid-belts-actually-exist

  • Dave

    I’m a bit annoyed at the waste of resources going into this, and the finger of blame pointing at lines and emergency crew.

    Raymond Riripi Tuporo, 26, smashed his car into a concrete power pole in Onehunga’s Neilson St in the early hours of September 2, 2012, on his way home from a party. He had been drinking, was over TWICE the legal limit and was doing 120 km/h in a 50 zone. In hitting the power pole, wires were brought down, and it took 2 hours to cut them off, in the meantime Tuporo was dead. So, they investigate why it took so long to cut the power, and apportion blame to the Lines company and fire services for not being able to turn the power off, and rescue him in time. Coroner Morag McDowell is hearing why it took the Fire Service Northpower and Vector so long to get the power off.

    From my perspective this defies logic, the same as putting the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff. The power pole and sub station were stationary. A man who was going twice the posted speed limit, and had been drinking took the power out. End of story, forget the power company and fire service. His relatives should be saying no inquiry, it was his fault.

    The coroner needs only say: I conclude Darwin wins again.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11375781

    • TonyM

      Those who work with electricity will know it pays to be safe not sorry. Not a second chance kind of deal.

      • Davo42

        Yup, unlike most dangerous things you don’t see it coming.

        • Moonroof

          It’s the friend you only shake hands with once.

  • Nige.

    So…I had a bit of something made of metal go in my eye today while using an angle grinder, (YES I WAS WEARING SAFETY GLASSES!!!!)

    The question begs; Would you rather be deaf or blind? (ARE you deaf?)

    • TonyM

      Face shield?

    • Pluto

      Maybe you should ask Andrea Vance, which one is worse ?

    • EveryWhichWayButLeft

      I’ve got bad hearing (congenital) and I have to say, I’d rather be deaf than blind. Even with being pretty deaf, I can read non-verbal communication and even read peoples’ lips.

      As a side note: after forty odd years of low volume I finally stumped up the $10k for quality hearing aids. They are simply awesome and have made a huge difference to my quality of life… When I hear [pun unintended] of people getting free/funded hearing aids and not using them I just shake my head in bewilderment.

    • Chris EM

      I have about 50% hearing lose and need hearing aids to hear people properly. Even then it can still be a challenge to hold a conversation sometimes. As for group conversations, that is pretty much out of the question now, as background noise stuffs up my ability to understand whoever i’m trying to talk to. So the social part of life certainly suffers.
      Deaf or blind? While I think it would be easier to carry on with a close to normal life being deaf, the jury is stlll out on that one with me.

    • caochladh

      I’m not deaf yet, but I have annoying tinnitus, which according to Prof. Goody was caused by too many high caliber rounds. There was no ear protection when I was in the Green Machine, so to all the shooters out there, get some ear plugs or you could end up with a whine in your head that will drive you to distraction at times.

      • Chris EM

        Prof. Goody in Auckland? I went to him, now retired? Same here with the tinnitus, although it’s either decreased as I’ve become deafer. or I’ve got used to it.

        • caochladh

          Yes, he had a clinic in Remuera, but that was some years ago. I need to have peripheral noise around all the time. No quiet bedroom or relaxing reading a book for me, the TV or stereo is on 24/7 in my house.

          • Gaynor

            Mine has decreased as I have become deafer. I am really only aware of it when I first wake up in the morning …it now sounds like a radio with a voice talking but turned down too low to hear more than the hum of a voice…
            While on the topic of deafness I wish someone would investigate the huge cost of hearing aids for what is very simple technology. The rise in the number of hearing aid businesses is surely connected with the huge profits being made.

          • Chris EM

            I think investigating the price of hearing aids may make for a good story for an investigative journalist. I’ve had three ‘repaired’ over the years because of careless use or water ingress, all my fault.
            The thing is the repaired ones are completely brand new on the outside, which leads me to think the inside is new as well, as the electronics are so tiny and would be very difficult to work on.
            These repaired ones cost 250 – 300 dollars. To buy new they are about $2500 a piece.

          • AlanB

            I bought a new pair of Hearing Aids (nearly typed just Aids which would confuse the conversation!) recently, German Siemens. Wonderful technology, could-have-bought-a-car price. Not a simple technology I would have thought, they have all sorts of memory and programme functions and diagnostic thingies for the hearing clinic preople to adjust. A few days afterwards a brother in law told me about Blamey and Saunders (trading as Australia Hears) who make great hearing aids in Australia which are MUCH cheaper (about $NZ1700) and you also program them yourself. I would have gone for these. No personal experience with them of course but worth a web search if anybody is interested.
            Worst thing about hearing aids for me? They make my ears Itch in the canal, sometimes to the extent of having to whip them out quickly and screw a pinkie in my earhole for relief.

        • Sooty

          Use to it. Changes tune all the time. I think it actually stopped for a second one day, it started up again as I was thinking what the. Other ear chimes in sometimes.

          • Chris EM

            Use to it. Thanks for that. Think I’ve had that wrong all my life.

      • LabTested

        I got my tinnitus from scuba diving. Specialist said every diver does damage every time they go down. I just did it all in one go. – ps being in the artillery probably didn’t help.

      • Doc45

        Same here cao. Its the first thing that registers in the morning and the last thing I hear at night. I can help myself if I can keep my head forward on the pillow all night, stop apnoea and keep the air passages open. I feel for people who suffer from it. For me it was standing between two .303 shooters when deerstalking at night with a spotlight when I had to be slightly forward to keep the light off the back sight. Being in line with the pin did immense damage but no one knew any different back 40 years ago.

      • Dumrse

        #2 on the gun, team shooter, shooting coach etc etc with the best ear protection available at the time…. sterile cotton wool, rolled into balls. It’s no wonder the tinnitus is in precise stereo with the occasional minute shift in the frequency in one ear which simply reminds me it is in both. It is often so loud I ask my wife if she can hear it.

        • caochladh

          I know what you mean. its like I have a lost tribe of cicada’s in my head, other times its white noise. The Prof recommended classical music, but that lasted only a few days. I bought a couple of Yamaha YSP 1100 sound bars for the TV’s in the lounge and bedroom some years ago and have found them excellent. They have lots of little speakers operating on different frequencies and that seems to equalize the noise in the head.

      • newbarnkiwi

        Got mine due to contracting malaria living abroad in the late 80s. The good folks at AU’s tinnitus clinic said a side effect of quinine treatment is hearing loss (upper tone levels). 20 years of the brain searching inside itself for high frequency sounds meant I woke up one day aware of the underlying working noise inside the brain.

    • (disclosure: I stole this)

      An old blind cowboy wanders into an all-girl biker bar by mistake…

      He finds his way to a bar stool and orders a shot of Jack Daniels.

      After sitting there for a while, he yells to the bartender, ‘Hey, you wanna hear a blonde joke?’

      The bar immediately falls absolutely silent.

      In a very deep, husky voice, the woman next to him says, ‘Before you tell that joke, Cowboy, I think it is only fair, given that you are blind, that you should know five things:

      The bartender is a blonde girl with a baseball bat.

      The bouncer is a blonde girl with a ‘Billy-Club’.

      I’m a 6-foot tall, 175-pound blonde woman with a black belt in karate.

      The woman sitting next to me is blonde and a professional weight lifter.

      The lady to your right is blonde and a professional wrestler.

      ‘Now, think about it seriously, Cowboy…. Do you still wanna tell that blonde joke?’

      The blind cowboy thinks for a second, shakes his head and mutters, ‘No…not if I’m gonna have to explain it five times…………’

      • JoJo

        I’m a blonde and have a great appreciation for clever blonde jokes…
        that was a good one!

    • Excitedly awaiting Whodunnit

      My missus say that I’m either deaf or just dont listen.

      Or at least I think that’s what she said.

      • Platinum Fox

        I think I’ve known a few people who are deaf in one ear and don’t listen with the other.

        • Excitedly awaiting Whodunnit

          The greens?

    • gander

      Nige:

      You have by now had the eye examined by a qualified medical practitioner?

      If you haven’t, get it looked at. NOW.

      • Nige.

        I did. I was very close to the hospital e.d department anyway so just dashed over to there. Was relatively straight forward.

        No. I don’t muck around. I don’t like pain!

    • AlanB

      Yes, Deaf as a post. Sight seems incomparably more valuable. I can generally follow a conversation with hearing aids, don’t bother with television, listen to music in a closed room with the old Technics gear full blast so no great deal really. Sympathy for the metal in the eye Nige, did the same years ago and not a pleasant experience.

  • TonyM

    So this was the latest iq test on tv3 news. Z CEO says oil price has come down 30% and this has been passed on because the price has gone down by 30 cents.

    Does he really think we are that dumb and what does the number of times the price has been adjusted have to do with anything. Let’s regulate, it would be a better choice than the power industry.

    I want my other 30 cents thanks.

    • JeffW2

      I think to get the other 30 cents you might have to ask Government to reduce petrol tax.

    • OT Richter

      The oil price only makes up a portion of the cost at the pump. Turning that oil into petrol hasn’t got any cheaper, nor has the cost of running the service station that sells it.

  • Curly1952

    I may have missed it (heard it on the 5 o,clock news this morning), but I saw no mention of the rise of 2.4% in the Fonterra Dairy Auction last night. That is good news for the farmers and the Nation as a whole. The thing that bugs me though is that when the prices were dropping the MSM were apoplectic now they go up, apparently no mention. If this isn’t bias reporting with an agenda I’ll go he!!

    • Cadwallader

      When the price of oil/gasoline goes up the TV presenters adopt a stern end-of-the-world countenance with their lips pursed like cat’s bums and utter tripe:”Motorists Be Warned a hike at the pump from tonight” this over a 2c rise. Yep, the NZ msm has a deep love of the negative.

      • The2Game

        Cadwallader, it’s the same when (not that this has happened much under a competent Government) interest rates rise…

        The mainstream media rush to tell us how much more Mr & Mrs Average Citizen With A Mortgage will need to pay per month.

        Not a word, of course, about those of us who:
        a) have paid off our mortgage(s) (and remember the high-teens interest rates WE had, eh? and

        b) have cash invested so as to net a wee bit of extra cash and who are over the moon that that wee bit of extra cash will be a wee bit bigger…

        • Platinum Fox

          Changes in interest rates are over-hyped. It isn’t rocket science, no one knows for sure what rates will do – trying to pick what rates will do and when is futile. The best approach is to spread limit your exposure to having to make a decision in adverse times. That applies to both borrowers and investors.
          Borrowers with even a small amount of brain should have split their debt into a range of maturities to lessen the impact of changes in interest rates, while having a amount at floating rate that they expect to be able to repay before the first fixed rate term expires. Having that piece revolving is a good option if they are sufficiently disciplined with [not] spending.
          Investors should likewise have their deposits split across a range of maturities so any change in their income is moderated.

    • unitedtribes

      Was mentioned on the 6an new Radio NZ I thought they said 1.5% increase

  • jude
    • Wasapilot

      How’s the chick getting along Jude?

      • jude

        He /she is gaining weight from 6grms birth to 73gms coming up to three weeks old sat. pic attached!

        • Grocersgirl

          That is one ugly little critter, but sort of cute/adorable at the same time. Love its little head tuft.

          • jude

            My daughter would be horrified you called him ugly ha ha!!He is getting more feathers daily so will get cuter with age:)

  • Pluto

    Have blogs made people more politically polarised ?
    Back in the day we were all only exposed to the MSM, we all formed our opinions based on the same set of “information.”
    I never thought I saw any extreme left or right stuff, except sort of knew the MSM were generally bleeding hearts and looking for the worst case scenario.
    That’s all changed now, particularly on the left where the new media provides an open platform for so much hate speak, and to be fair some on the far right (briefly) vent their spleen here too.
    Are blogs simply the mouthpiece of what’s always been there, or do they enhance it ?

    • MaryLou

      I think they enhance it. Whereas (as you say) there used to be only a few sources of information, now there are many. To discuss items of interest you needed to be aware that you were face to face with people whose views might differ partially or wholly from your own. Blog takes away the need to moderate your views, and because people gravitate to “like”, their views are constantly reinforced on blogs with people who generally agree with you.

      Add the anonymity of computers, and it’s not hard for people’s outlooks to become more firmly entrenched. Plus a sense of righteousness when you have many people verifying your viewpoint. From there, it becomes a matter of surprise and resentment (for some), when in the real world you still encounter people who disagree with you just as vehemently. Kinda makes for intolerance on both sides…

    • dobbyblogs

      Interesting question. The link is a Pew survey of polarization in the US and is possibly applicable to NZ. My gut feeling is blogs (and internet in general) are a contributing factor, as you can get confirmational bias on more or less everything you believe which in turn strengthens your beliefs. For example, I suspect John Key is a Reptilian, I’ll type that into Google to check….

      http://www.people-press.org/2014/06/12/political-polarization-in-the-american-public/

      • MaryLou

        Hilarious! Apparently an OIA was lodged for information to prove he wasn’t, and Eagleson responded that there were no such documents! Why, oh why would that even make it through as a question??

  • ozbob68

    Did anyone see this article, about Ronald Van Der Platt being denied parole because they can’t monitor him. If you ever get the chance, and if TVNZ ever replay it, watch “heart of darkness – The Tanjas Darke story”, about how this man kept his daughter as a sex slave for 23 years. One seriously eye-opening documentary.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/64236022/no-parole-for-man-who-kept-daughter-as-sex-slave

  • dgrogan

    A bit of late night sax.

  • Isherman

    So what holiday reading y’all got planned? For me I’d like to get John Le Carre’s ‘An Inconvenient Truth’, and either ‘Close Call’ or ‘Open Secret’ by former MI5 chief Stella Remmington. If the summer is going to be anything like Auckland today I should get through them pretty quickly.

    edit added word.

    • 40something

      Janet Frame’s – Gorse is not People and Graham Norton’s bio plus a book called Shantaram I started two years ago and want to finish. But will probably read three pages of any of them and fall asleep in the chair – that’s what kids and Christmas do to you.

    • Moonroof

      Just started a re-read of Anthony Bourdain’s Kitchen Confidential, likely Neal Stephenson’s Baroque Cycle will follow – must finish it this time :)

      • Isherman

        Bourdains TV doc series ‘Parts Unknown’ was a good watch too.

        • Moonroof

          Sure is, working through current season now. His No Reservations back catalogue is worth a look too, same production team, different network.

          • RockinBob625

            Would seriously love Bourdain as a travel guide and dinner companion. He seems to know all the ‘best’ places.

    • Wasapilot

      John Cleese latest, Mick Fleetwood bio, and the John Key bio that I got when it first came out, but my father in law “borrowed”, he better have it when we arrive on Christmas eve.

      • Isherman

        Yes I must get Keys bio at some stage. Oddly enough and being a ‘political animal’ type that we here tend to be, I’ve read relatively few books on NZ politicians and leaders, yet for world leaders and figures I’ve read everything from Shimon Peres to Anwar Sadat, and Lech Walesa to Fidel Castro…go figure.

    • ozbob68

      The Frood (Douglas Adams bio).

      • Isherman

        Slightly different, sounds like it could be interesting.

    • EveryWhichWayButLeft

      I have a whole stack ready to go.
      Sebastian Junger: War, Gen. Heinz Guderian: Panzer Leader and Maj. Dick Winters: Beyond Band of Brothers are the first three off the shelf.

      nb: good old fashioned dead tree variety too…

      • Wasapilot

        Dick Winters book is a fantastic read EWWBL. I think all of the Easy company men have passed on now, truely amazing men.

        • jude

          The DVD series is very watchable.We have the book too, I have not read that, but Al enjoyed it.

          • Wasapilot

            We have the DVD set too Jude. On a bleak winters day we have been known to watch the entire series in one day. Some of the best television ever made IMHO.

            Glad to hear Mr Jingles is doing well.

          • jude

            There is a higher chance he is a male due to his colouring. His dad is a grey/split cinnamon and mother is a pearl.
            When he can feed himself and is a fledgling I will be very happy:)

          • ozbob68

            When you go on the battlefield tours around Normandy (like I did), they play episode 2 of Band of Brothers when they visit the sites from the invasion.

            Edit: on the bus on the ride in, not in a theatre or anyting.

          • jude

            That would be a moving experience. The Band of Brothers,we have some of the boys that visit our daughters,enjoy watching:)

        • EveryWhichWayButLeft

          I’ve got all the Easy Company books either here, on order or in my Amazon wishlist. After Winters I’m going to read gonorrhea (Bill Guarnere) then probably Don Malarkey followed by Shifty Powers.

          In between I’ll probably watch the HBO series another dozen times :D

          • Wasapilot

            The interviews with the men of Easy Company in the extras on the DVD set are as good a watch as the series itself. Very moving.

          • BW_Lord

            I make it a point to watch the full series at least once every year, and could go again about now. Thanks for the reminder

      • Isherman

        Dead tree variety is all I do, no intention of getting an E reader or such. Though it does take more dead trees for all the extra bookshelf space, but I can live with that, got books for africa at my place.

        • jude

          Al has e-reader but I must admit I love to hold a book, and I am guilty of sniffing the paper:)

          • Isherman

            The older and more musty the better in my view.

          • Wasapilot

            That goes for the person reading the book as well as the book itself in my case

          • rantykiwi

            Hard to Find bookshop in Onehunga is well worth a visit if you get the chance. Loads of books, loads of musty, and loads of enjoyment.

        • rantykiwi

          I have a e-reader. After about 30 minutes of using it to read a book I decided that I’m really a dead tree book type of guy. Now it’s a repository of all the equipment manuals and tech notes for work – only read from necessity so enjoyment doesn’t enter the equation and much lighter to carry than the folders full of dead trees I’d need otherwise.

      • caochladh

        Several years ago, I wrote to Bill Guarnere and he was kind enough to sign and personalise copies of his book which I gave to all my mates as Christmas presents. Sadly, he passed away this year

    • jude

      Judi Dench biography is on my wish list, and I also am going to read “Hot Pink Spice Saga” an Indian culinary travelogue with recipes.Written by Julie Le Clerc and Peta Mathias.

    • Betty Swallocks

      A couple of re-reads lined up; ‘Bloodlands – Europe Between Hitler And Stalin’ by Timothy Snyder and ‘A City Possessed’ by Lynley Hood. There’s also a new one that Mrs BS thinks I don’t know she’s bought for me ‘The Sleepwalkers – How Europe Went To War In 1914’ by Christopher Clark.

      • Isherman

        Sounds like my sort of line up….

        • Betty Swallocks

          I thought it probably would. I’m lucky enough to have floor-to-ceiling bookcases around three walls of one of our lounges. One wall is military history; just about everything from Alexander of Macedon to the Zeebrugge raid.

          • Isherman

            Nice, I have stuff from a similar period span, but I’m quite heavy with conflicts and geopolitics of the middle east, Arab -Israeli wars in particular, Cold war period conflicts, and Post WW Europe, Balkans etc, and lots of reference, as I collect militaria also.

    • Cadwallader

      The older I get I seem to read more non-fiction than previously. Still pondering but have bought heaps of books during the year so I have choices galore. The problem with holiday reading is you never quite get through it all so some books are left for future breaks.

  • goat

    With all the news about terrorists at the moment ,does any one remember the case of mr Zeoui that started in 2002 when he first came to the counrty and was locked up for his ties with the islamic salvation front as he was considered a security risk back then. What would happen to some one like that now ? would they be turned away at the border ?If Mr key says they have their eye on 30-40 nutters at the moment , is he still one of them? Thanks to the do-gooders at the time this case was dragged through the courts for 4 years costing us millions in Lawyers fees.Would this still happen today?

    • caochladh

      I think we should apply the old maxim across the board “If in doubt, throw them out”.

    • Isherman

      He was granted citizenship earlier this year I think, and the security Cert was removed. Not sure if he still has any association with the ISF, but he wont be going on holiday back to Algeria, because if he does he will only be coming back in a box in a cargo hold if at all.

  • caochladh
  • Gaynor

    Wow Paul Henry gave it to the Herald tonight re..today’s front page.

    • Wasapilot

      And now he has gower on

      • gambler

        gower is going to give himself some serious whiplash with the rate of speed he changes from looking at Paul and the other guest lol

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