Apparently, 3 million Germans are in poverty

Statistical poverty hits again.  And no surprises, Oxfam and the UN are quoted.  Wait until you see what income they define as the “breadline” in Germany.  You’ll be immigrating the same day.

Bonus:  You get to learn a new word.

Being employed in Germany is no longer enough to make ends meet, as around 3.1 million workers receive salaries below the country’s poverty threshold. People have been forced to cut back on food and heating in order to survive, German media reported.

You’re going to love what that threshold is.

The number of workers living in poverty surged 25 percent between 2008 and 2013 – Saarbrücker Zeitung newspaper citing Germany’s Federal Statistical Office data. In 2008, there were just 2.5 million workers living below the minimum income deemed adequate.

In 2013, the German poverty line was a salary of €979 (about USD$1,097) per person.

That’s an annual salary of NZD 76503.96.  

Surveyed workers said they have cut back on things like food and heating in order to make ends meet, including rent payments, data from 2013 household surveys showed.

Make ends meet.  On 76k.

During that year, over 530,000 low-income workers could only afford to eat one full meal every other day, and over 417,000 others were living without enough heat. Another 380,000 workers said they were behind on their rent payments.

Taking a vacation was also out of question for 1.5 million employees, while 600,000 others could not afford a car.

New Zealand is one of the most expensive countries to live, being in the top 10, and I can assure you that lots of people would love to be on the German poverty line at $75k of salary.

“The number of workers who earn scarcely or marginally more than the government unemployment benefits (Hartz IV) is alarmingly high,” the president of the social association VdK Ulrike Mascher told the Saarbrücker Zeitung.

Latest data from Oxfam, released in January, reveals that wealth disparity has been rising. The report estimated that the collective wealth of the world’s richest 1 percent will exceed that of the other 99 percent of the global population next year, “leaving ordinary people voiceless and their interests uncared for.”

Last July, the UN issued a report stating that more than 2.2 billion people worldwide are “either near or living in poverty.”

Get ready for your bonus phrase.

“Almost 1.5 billion people are multi-dimensionally poor, with overlapping deprivations in health, education and living standards. And close to 800 million people are vulnerable to falling back into poverty when setbacks occru,” the 2014 Human Development Report said.

Keep an ear out for multi-dimensionally poor from the usual suspects in Mana, Labour and the Greens.  In our case, poverty means they can’t have a smart phone for each family member, a Sky subscription and an annual holiday.  Oh, and the odd take-way.  Let’s not forget.

It’s one thing to define some kind of statistical poverty, but why are the media so complicit in beating this up as if it is real?  It’s some arbitrary number.  Tell people in India that Germans can’t get by on 4.3 million rupees per year, and they’ll think you’re from another planet.

Which rather amusingly describes the UN and their criminal attempts to define poverty in such a way as to make it effectively meaningless.   Except.   The media keep quoting as if it is chiseled on a set of stone tablets carried down from Mt Sinai.   There is nobody willing to criticise the word of the UN.


– RT

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.