Apparently you can defame an imam

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A hardline imam at a mosque where the killers of soldier Lee Rigby worshipped is suing the BBC, saying it described him as an ‘extremist’.

Shakeel Begg, 37, is taking legal action after presenter Andrew Neil said on the Sunday Politics Show that the imam had praised jihad as ‘the greatest of deeds’.

Don’t you just love it?  We’re not allowed to draw a picture of Muhammed, but if we call them nasty names they run straight to a court of law.   Surely there is some disconnect here?

According to the High Court writ, Mr Neil interviewed Farooq Murad, then head of the Muslim Council of Britain, during the Sunday Politics Show in November 2013.

Mr Neil said the East London Mosque in Whitechapel was ‘a venue for a number of extremist speakers…who espouse extremist positions’.

The presenter added: ‘This year Shakeel Begg, he spoke there and hailed jihad as the greatest of deeds.’

Mr Begg, head of the Lewisham Islamic Centre in South-East London, is demanding libel damages and that the BBC doesn’t again call him an ‘extremist’ who ‘encourages religious violence’.

Mr Begg did not deny Mr Rigby’s killers – Michael Adebolajo, 28, and Michael Adebowale, 22 – attended the Lewisham Islamic Centre in the months leading up to the Woolwich attack.

This is the future of any nation that allows radical Islam to take root.  The easiest way to prevent it is to keep their numbers low.   In our case, immigration of Muslims must be urgently reviewed.

 

– Mail Online


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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