BG2: Can belonging to an on-line group provide “just enough” support?

Some, perhaps most of us aren’t geared up to join a gym or weight loss group where we live.  Blubbergeddon might provide a useful halfway house.


I’ve only been selectively reading posts over the break, and didn’t actually pick up on the BG2 challenge until about 5 mins ago. Which fits in nicely because I was told a few days ago by my wife of 30 years that I’d let myself go and that I needed to lose more than a few pounds.

Of course I know that. I’ve known it for years. But I’ve struggled to do anything about it. Short bursts, ok, but normally something happened to make me go back. The Chch earthquake and consequential comfort eating was always a good recent excuse! 4 years is a lot of comfort food…

So now, at age 57, I’m 115kg, and could do with losing about 20 of them at least.

My wife has suggested that I get some help or support. To my mind that just conjures up images of well meaning middle class women telling me what to do without any understand of what the real issues/problems/challenges are. So of course I ignore the idea.

BUT THEN! I see that there’s a support group here! And I think I can be fairly confident that there aren’t any know-it-all middle class do-gooding greenie tree-huggers in it! So can I join? Please? Perhaps the idea of TWP being embarrassed globally on NZ’s leading blog if he can’t stick to it may just be enough to help me achieve my goal!

The Whinging Pom

One of the drivers of being part of a real-world support group is that you can’t cheat.  Either you stop going, or people know you’ve fallen off the wagon.

In my view, if you do end up falling off the wagon with Blubbergeddon, just delete your line from the spreadsheet, and that’s it.

Maybe this time wasn’t the right time for you to get started.  I know you need to have your head in the right space.  No judgements here.   No peer pressure here.

And definitely don’t put in fake weight updates to make it look like you’re doing OK.


I have what people describe as an addictive personality.  Unfortunately that doesn’t mean other people think I’m addictive, instead it means that when I find something I like, I tend to have little self control.

This can have a good side.  Whaleoil is, for example, one of the things I put a ridiculous amount of time into – but I don’t care.  I love doing it.   When it comes to food however, there had to be an end to it.  I knew this for a lot longer than a few weeks ago.   But you wait for the time when you are ready to make a real commitment.

I did it with alcohol, and I’m ready now to do it with food.  I “finally got there”.

Some of you will not be ready yet, and will have a half-hearted attempt at it.   That’s OK with me.  False starts are fine.  It just means you will need to get ready for the day when you make a real commitment and you aren’t just wishing good things for yourself.

One of the reasons people give up is because they make it too hard!   With the initial enthusiasm, they go all out, and set a pace that can’t be sustained.  They actually set themselves up to fail.

It took YEARS to put it on.  Get ready for the idea that it might take YEARS to take it all off again.  There are no easy fixes.   And if it is something that will take years, it means you need to make it part of your normal life.

Not something you “do” for a few months, and then come back to the same bad habits that got you here.

I tried the Atkins diet before, and boy it works really well.  But it is very, very hard to keep up over a long period of time.  It can also be pricey to eat a lot of protein.

I tried protein shakes before, and boy it really works well.  But who the hell wants to be on a liquid diet for the rest of their lives?

This is what attracted me to the 5:2 diet.  It means that out of 5 days of your week, you can eat cream, or chocolate, or have a cake, or whatever it takes to keep your mind committed to the goal of long term, slow and steady health benefits.

Personally I find myself being a little stricter on “normal” days too, as I don’t want to lose the gains I’ve made.  Right now I’m visiting my mum, and to say “no” to all the good food on offer is nearly impossible.   What I do find myself doing is taking small portions.

If you select a method of weight loss you can’t stick to, you need to look for one that you can do for years on end.   You shouldn’t be in a hurry.  If I drop half a kilo a week, I’ll be a happy man, because I’m just fine with weighing 26kg less this time next year.

You need to find something that fits your personality, your body, and your needs.  For me it is 5:2.  What can you do for a year or more without giving up?

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