How dangerous is radiation really?

You know how they tell you that nuclear radiation has insane half lives that basically means that when anything is contaminated, it takes thousands if not tens of thousands of years to decay to safe levels?

Why doesn’t that work out in the real world?

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For the first time since the 2011 disaster, all of the rice harvested in Fukushima Prefecture this year has passed radiation tests and now can be deemed safe for consumption, according to local officials.

Virtually all of the rice harvested in Fukushima in 2014 – or some 360,000 tonnes – has been checked for radiation and met the national standards of less than 100 Becquerel’s per kilogram, Reuters reports.

“The fact that the amount of rice that does not pass our checks has steadily reduced in the last three years indicates that we’re taking the right steps,” said Fukushima official Tsuneaki Oonam, who heads the department that oversees Fukushima rice farming.

Authorities began testing all rice grown in Fukushima prefecture in 2012, although the amounts harvested over the past years were insignificant. More 190 testing devices are used throughout the prefecture to ensure rice’s safety standards.

Before you come up with an easy answer, how about Hiroshima?

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Doesn’t quite look like it used to “only” 7 decades ago

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Somehow the radioactive contamination gets dealt with a lot faster than the laboratory measured “half-life” that we were all told exists.

For decades during the cold war we were told that any place where a serious nuclear incident takes place becomes uninhabitable for … centuries?  Longer?

Japan exported its first rice following the disaster last August – a 300-kilogram batch was delivered to Singapore. Fruit exports to Malaysia also resumed last year, according to officials, while in 2012 Fukushima peaches and apples were exported to Thailand.

Something’s not right.

 

– RT

 


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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